Publications

Accessibility


Search results

21 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type













New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
2015 North Dakota Field Crop Fungicide Guide - PP622
This fungicide guide is based on the latest information available from the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station. U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the agricultural chemical industry.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
2017 Sugarbeet Production Guide - A1698
The production guide will provide useful information to assist you in making timely management decisions.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Anthracnose Alert - PP1603
This devastating disease of dry edible beans has been increasing in North Dakota. This poster provides you with colored pictures that help you identify the disease.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Anthracnose of Dry Beans - PP1233
Anthracnose is an economically damaging disease of dry beans that can cause significant levels of seed discoloration and large reductions in yield. The disease is readily transmitted from infected seed to seedlings, which will result in fieldwide epidemics that can spread to nearby fields when the environment is favorable for infection and spread. Because infected seed is not always discolored, the use of certified disease-free seed is critical for management of anthracnose. Further, the disease is difficult to control with foliar fungicides and seed treatments, and the pathogen can develop new races that overcome genetic resistance, making prevention the best disease management strategy.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Clubroot of Canola Alert - PP1700
Clubroot is caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae. The pathogen survives in the soil and infects the roots of canola and other Brassicae plants (such as broccoli, cauliflower, Shepherd’s purse and wild mustard), causing a galling and swelling, and giving them a “club” appearance.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Comparison of Cercospora and Bacterial Leaf Spots on Sugar Beet - PP1244
Cercospora commonly occurs, can result in considerable loss in yield and quality and reduces storability of sugar beet roots in piles. Bacterial Leaf Spots commonly occurs but usually not of economic importance; some rhizomania-resistant varieties have shown increased susceptibility to bacterial leaf spot.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Fungal Leaf Spot Diseases of Wheat: Tan Spot, Stagonospora nodorum bloch and septoria tritici blotch - PP1249
This publication provides information for the identification and management of the common fungal leaf spot diseases found in wheat in North Dakota
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Fusarium Yellows of Sugar Beet - PP1247
Fusarium yellows of sugarbeet was identified in the Red River Valley in a few fields between Moorhead, Minn., and Drayton, N.D., in 2002. Fusarium yellows is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae, although other Fusarium species can be involved as secondary invaders. The disease causes significant reduction in root yield and recoverable sucrose. In storage, the quality of infected roots may deteriorate more rapidly than in noninfected roots.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Impatiens Downy Mildew: A Threat to a Favorite Shade Plant - PP1702
Impatiens downy mildew was first detected in ND in 2013. Homeowners must be vigilant when purchasing and planting standard impatiens to prevent the spread of this disease across ND. This publication describes the signs and symptoms of the disease and offers alternatives to planting standard impatiens in the ornamental landscape.
Located in Landing Pages / Gardens, Lawns & Trees
IPM Basics Integrated Pest Management in North Dakota Agriculture - PP863
Integrated pest management (IPM) is an integral part of North Dakota’s agriculture. IPM is a program to manage pests that combines a number of strategies to reduce pest risks while protecting the environment, wildlife and people. The goal of IPM in agriculture is to produce safe, abundant and affordable food, feed and fiber. The target pests generally are weeds, insects, and disease-causing organisms such as fungi, bacteria, viruses and nematodes.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Creative Commons License
Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. Thanks.