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2012 Dry Bean Grower Survey of Production, Pest Problems and Pesticde Use in Minnesota and North Dakota - E1640
The 2012 dry bean grower survey is the 23rd annual assessment of varieties grown, pest problems, pesticide use and grower practices of the Northarvest Bean Growers Association, an association of dry edible bean growers in Minnesota and North Dakota.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
2016 Weed Control Guide - W253
The information in this guide provides a summary of herbicide uses in crops grown in North Dakota and is based on federal and state herbicide labels, research at ND Ag. Experiment Stations, and information from the North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Absinth Wormwood Control - W838
Absinth wormwood (Artemisia absinthium L.) is a perennial forb which is easily recognized by its strong sage odor. The plant also is known as American or common wormwood, mugwort or madderwort, and wormwood sage. It is grown in herb gardens for the sage flavor of the leaves. The young flower heads are the source of aromatic oil used to prepare vermouth and absinth.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Biology and Management of Biennial Wormwood - W1322
Biennial wormwood is an aggressive and prolific seed-producing plant that has become a problem mainly in soybean and dry edible bean production areas of Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota. Biennial wormwood, as its name infers, was primarily biennial when the species fi rst was classified, but weedy cropland biotypes of biennial wormwood are annual plants. Many factors, such as season-long emergence, prevalence in moist environments, adaptation to all tillage systems, tolerance to commonly used soil-applied and postemergence herbicides, and misidentification of biennial wormwood as common ragweed, contribute to increased biennial wormwood infestations. Some herbicides used to control common ragweed do not control biennial wormwood.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Documentation for Suspected Herbicide Drift Damage - WC751
Herbicide drift to nontarget plants can cause damage suffi cient to result in a signifi cant monetary loss. Documentation of chemical damage is required if compensation for loss will be pursued. In addition, establish the source of drift and amount of loss caused by the damage.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Effect of Glyphosate on Potatoes - A1642
Potatoes can have reduced yield and quality in the growing season when affected by glyphosate. Furthermore, seed potatoes can store glyphosate residues until the following year and when planted they can have emergence problems that ultimately can reduced yield.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Home Lawn Problems and Solutions for North Dakota - H1553
The intent of this publication is to assist the homeowner in identifying problems and providing advice on actions they can take to solve these problems.
Located in Landing Pages / Gardens, Lawns & Trees
Identification and Control of Invasive and Troublesome Weeds in North Dakota - W1411
Th is publication is intended to help land managers properly identify and control noxious and invasive weeds found in the state. Th e current list of 11 noxious weeds are included, as well as species listed by various counties as noxious. Other species included are either invasive weeds found in bordering states with the potential to move into North Dakota or are commonly misidentifi ed native species that do not require control eff orts, such as the native thistles.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Integrated Management of Leafy Spurge - W866
Leafy spurge is the most difficult noxious weed to control in North Dakota and infests all 53 counties in a variety of environments. Leafy spurge is found in pasture, rangeland, cropland, roadsides, shelterbelts, and other non-cultivated areas. Cultivation will control leafy spurge in conventional cropland, but the weed can become the dominant species in reduced-till cropland, pas-ture, and rangeland if not controlled.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
IPM Basics Integrated Pest Management in North Dakota Agriculture - PP863
Integrated pest management (IPM) is an integral part of North Dakota’s agriculture. IPM is a program to manage pests that combines a number of strategies to reduce pest risks while protecting the environment, wildlife and people. The goal of IPM in agriculture is to produce safe, abundant and affordable food, feed and fiber. The target pests generally are weeds, insects, and disease-causing organisms such as fungi, bacteria, viruses and nematodes.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
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