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Safe Food for Babies: Handling Breast Milk, Formula and Baby Food - FN656
Infants and young children are most at risk for foodborne illness because their immune systems are not fully developed. Follow the tips in this publication to keep breast milk, formula and baby food safe for babies.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Safe Food for Babies and Children: A Guide for Babysitters- Parents Edition - FN663
As a parent, you most likely will need a babysitter to look after your children at some time. Infants and young children are especially vulnerable to foodborne illness, and even a small error in food preparation can cause severe illness. Making sure your babysitter is prepared to provide care safely will assure a positive experience for both you and your sitter.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Safe Food For Babies and Children: Choking Dangers - FN664
Every child is at risk of choking: Older infants and children less than 5 years old easily can choke on food, toys and household objects. A single choking incident may result in death, permanent brain damage due to lack of oxygen and other complications associated with airway blockage. This publication provides tips on choking prevention.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Safe Food for Babies and Children: Heating Solid Food Safely - FN715
Whether warming bottles or solid foods, it is ALWAYS important to use safe heating practices to keep your baby happy and healthy. Although you may be an expert at feeding your little one, remember that babysitters and family members may not know how to heat bottles and food correctly. Leaving complete instructions in a handy location, such as on the refrigerator door, may help you and the caregiver feel comfortable and relaxed come feeding time.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Eat Smart: Enjoy Healthier Snacks at Work - FN1398
Are you tempted by bowls of candy and trays of cookies at work? Say no to secondhand sweets, and think twice about the food you offer at meetings and around the office. Are you eating enough fruits, vegetables and whole grains? Eating small, frequent, healthy meals or snacks will keep your energy up and make you less likely to overeat at your next meal.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Exercise Your Brain - FN1431
Physical activity helps maintain good blood flow to the brain. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that most adults get 30 minutes of moderate activity most days, preferably every day. Short segments of physical activity (such as three 10-minute walks) count toward the goal. Stimulate your brain by adding variety to your activities. Try a new activity, alternate activities throughout the week or take a new route when you walk or jog. Routine activities don’t challenge your brain, so mix it up a little.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Now Serving: Recipe Makeovers - FN1447
Learn to prepare your old family favorites in new, healthier ways with these recipe makeovers. Not all recipes need a makeover. If you can answer yes to the following questions, the recipe might be right for a makeover.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Vary Your Veggies: Why Eat Vegetables - FN1452
Vegetables are versatile, nutritious, colorful and flavorful. Not only are they naturally low in calories, fat and sodium, but they also are good sources of important vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber. Vegetables do not contain cholesterol. Increasing vegetable consumption can replace foods higher in calories and fat. Vegetables are rich sources of vitamins, particularly A and C. The value of a vegetable as a source of a nutrient is affected both by the amount of the nutrient present and by the amount of the vegetable eaten.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Vary Your Veggies: How to Prepare Vegetables - FN1453
Try something new! To take advantage of all their benefits, eat a variety of colors every day and vary your cooking methods to add variety to your menus. Cooking methods: microwave, steam, sitr-fry, pan, bake, broil.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Vary Your Veggies: Serve More Vegetables - FN1455
Most adults and children need 2 to 3 cups of vegetables per day, but the amount varies depending on age, gender and amount of physical activity.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
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