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Fertilizing Canola and Mustard - SF1122
Canola is an important crop in North Dakota. It is grown for its oil content for both food and fuel purposes. Nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) requirements of canola and mustard are similar to those of small grains. Sulfur (S) requirements for canola are higher than most crops. Soil test results direct fertilizer rates for N, P, K and S. Soil cores should be taken from 0 to 24 inches deep and divided into 0- to 6-inch and 6- to 24-inch samples. P and K should be analyzed on the 0- to 6-inch sample, while N and S should be tested on each depth.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Fertilizing Hard Red Spring Wheat and Durum - SF712
Nitrogen management is a key to successful wheat production. Recommendations include consideration of wheat yield and protein response to added N within three major state agri-climatology zones, and the use of wheat price and N cost in determining N rate. These recommendations are based on the concept that identifies an optimal N rate for greatest net income, not greatest yield.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Anhydrous Ammonia: Managing The Risks
Anhydrous ammonia has the potential to be one of the most dangerous chemicals used in agriculture today. It is used and stored under high pressures, which requires specially designed and well-maintained equipment. Those who work with anhydrous ammonia must be trained to follow exact procedures in handling it.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Working to Avoid Nitrogen Contamination (AE1218)
Activities of human beings have changed the balance of nitrogen (N) on the planet. Burning fossil fuels for energy, intensive use of land to grow food, and disposal of organic wastes have an effect on the N cycle. Studying the influence of our activities on the N cycle helps us understand the consequences of changing the balance of N in the environment.
Located in Landing Pages / Environment & Natural Resources
Active Optical Sensor Algorithms: How they work and how they can be used to calculate N requirements in the field - SF1176-5
Research from 2011 to 2013 has resulted in a data base that supports to use of active-optical sensors to direct side-dress N rates in corn. Previously, rates were determined using a grower best guess.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Nitrogen Extenders and Additives for Field Crops (SF1581)
Nitrogen is lost from soil through the activity of soil bacterial transformation of ammonium to nitrate, and from nitrate, the N can be lost leaching or denitrifcation. There are chemistries available that inhibit the transformation of ammonium to nitrate, and there are also compounds that inhibit urease enzyme activity, decreasing the risk of ammonia volatility.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
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