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Emerald Ash Borer Biology and Integrated Pest Management in North Dakota - E1634
This publication summarizes the threat of invasive metallic wood-boring beetle, emerald ash borer, to ND's ash trees. It's identification, biology, damage and pest management strategies including cultural, plant resistance, biological control and chemical control are discussed. If you suspect that your ash tree is infested with emerald ash borer, it also tells you what to do.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
IPM Basics Integrated Pest Management in North Dakota Agriculture - PP863
Integrated pest management (IPM) is an integral part of North Dakota’s agriculture. IPM is a program to manage pests that combines a number of strategies to reduce pest risks while protecting the environment, wildlife and people. The goal of IPM in agriculture is to produce safe, abundant and affordable food, feed and fiber. The target pests generally are weeds, insects, and disease-causing organisms such as fungi, bacteria, viruses and nematodes.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Baseline Water Quality in Areas of Oil Development - WQ1614
As oil development increases in North Dakota, private water well owners may be concerned about the quality and quantity of water they use or may use in the future.
Located in Landing Pages / Environment & Natural Resources
Blister Beetles - E1002
Blister beetles are infrequent pests of several crops including alfalfa, sweet clover, potatoes, beans, and sugar beets. They are also injurious to a wide variety of vegetables and many flowers and other ornamentals. They normally cause limited plant damage. However, when they are ingested by horses or other livestock, serious illness or even death may result.brief summary
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Evaluation of Soils for Suitability for Tile Drainage Performance - SF1617
The presence of salts and high water tables in North Dakota soils due to an extended climactic wet cycle recently has stimulated interest in the installation of tile drainage systems. The tile controls the water table and encourages the leaching and removal of salts from the soil above the tile lines. This improves soil productivity, culminating in improved crop yields.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Options for Land Application of Solid Manure - NM1613
Based on the type of livestock facility, manure can be handled and stored as a liquid (less than 5 percent dry matter), slurry (5 to 10 percent dry matter) and/or solid (greater than 15 percent dry matter). Figure 1 shows the relative consistency of the various types of manure that common animal species excrete. Depending on manure consistency, manure application equipment and application methods differ significantly.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Selecting a Sprinkler Irrigation System - AE91
The four basic methods of irrigation are: subsurface irrigation (“subirrigation,” which uses tile drain lines), surface or gravity irrigation, trickle irrigation (also called drip irrigation) and sprinkler irrigation. Of the acres currently irrigated in North Dakota, more than 80 percent use some type of sprinkler system. Statewide, the center pivot is the most popular sprinkler system.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
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