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Know Your Knapweeds - W1146
North Dakota is being threatened by three noxious weeds that could infest more acreage in the state and at a faster rate than leafy spurge. Members of this trio include spotted, diffuse, and Russian knapweed. These three knapweeds already infest more acreage than leafy spurge in Montana and Minnesota, and have been found in over 20 counties in North Dakota
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Integrated Pest Management of Pea Leaf Weevil in North Dakota (E1879)
This publication summarizes Integrated Pest Management of pea leaf weevil including host plants (field peas and faba beans), geographic range, identification, life cycle, crop damage, monitoring, economic threshold, cultural control, and chemical control.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Identification and Control of Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.) - W1132
Purple loosestrife, a beautiful garden plant with an aggressive nature, was first introduced into North America in the early 1800s. The plant was sold in North Dakota by its genus name Lythrum for at least 50 years. Lythrum plants were brought to North Dakota for flower gardens because of their striking color, ease of growth, winter hardiness, and lack of insect or disease problems. The garden varieties of purple loosestrife were sold by many cultivar names including Morden Pink, Drop-more Purple, and Morden Gleam. These garden cultivars were thought to be sterile but have now been shown to cross-pollinate with the wild Lythrum type and sometimes with other Lythrum cultivars.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Pinto Bean Response to Phosphorus Starter Fertilizer in East-central North Dakota (A1883)
This is a production reference to highlight pinto bean fertilizer research.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Management of Insecticide-resistant Soybean Aphids (E1878)
This publication summarizes the development of insecticide resistance in soybean aphids in the upper Midwest and how to manage insecticide resistance using an Integrated Pest Management approach.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Site-specific Farming: Developing Zone Soil Sampling Maps (SF1176-2 Revised)
This circular, although originally published in 2008 is still relevant and useful as is. Although almost half of the ND farmers utilize some site-specific technology, the other half would also benefit from its use.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Pulse Crop Insect Diagnostic Series: Field Pea, Lentil and Chickpea (E1877)
This publication summarizes Integrated Pest Management for insect pests of pulse crops including identification, crop damage, monitoring or scouting tips, economic threshold, cultural control, host plant resistance, biological control and chemical control.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Site-specific Farming: What is Site-specific Farming? (SF1176-1 Revised)
This circular, although originally published in 2008 is still relevant and useful as its. Although almost half of ND farmers utilize some site-specific technology, the other half would also benefit from its use.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Fusarium Yellows of Sugar Beet - PP1247
Fusarium yellows of sugarbeet was identified in the Red River Valley in a few fields between Moorhead, Minn., and Drayton, N.D., in 2002. Fusarium yellows is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae, although other Fusarium species can be involved as secondary invaders. The disease causes significant reduction in root yield and recoverable sucrose. In storage, the quality of infected roots may deteriorate more rapidly than in noninfected roots.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Plant Disease Management: Sugar Beet Powdery Mildew ( PP967 Revised)
Powdery mildew is a sporadic fungal leaf disease of sugar beet in the Red River Valley and southern Minnesota sugar beet-production areas. It first was found in Minnesota and North Dakota in 1975. In recent years, the use of triazole and strobilurin fungicides for Cercospora leaf spot control has limited powdery mildew development. Recent discoveries of the sexual stage of the powdery mildew fungus in several sugar beet producing states could lead to potential biological changes in the fungus, making it more difficult to control.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
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