Publications

Accessibility


Search results

31 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type













New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
Selecting a Sprinkler Irrigation System - AE91
The four basic methods of irrigation are: subsurface irrigation (“subirrigation,” which uses tile drain lines), surface or gravity irrigation, trickle irrigation (also called drip irrigation) and sprinkler irrigation. Of the acres currently irrigated in North Dakota, more than 80 percent use some type of sprinkler system. Statewide, the center pivot is the most popular sprinkler system.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
North Dakota Corn Hybrid Trial Results for 2012 and Selection Guide - A793-12
This publication reports the results of corn hybrid trials that were conducted by NDSU research and Extension personnel throughout North Dakota. The hybrids tested were entered voluntarily by the companies that market them, and the management of these trials was financed partially by the entry fee those companies paid.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
North Dakota Field Crop Insect Management Guide - E1143
This guide summarizes the insecticides/miticides registered in North Dakota for control of insect or mite pests of filed crops. Scouting and economic thresholds are listed for the major pest. Keeping in mind that chemical control is only part of an Integrated Pest Management approach. The most effective control may involve integrating culture, host plant resistance and other strategies.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
North Dakota Corn Hybrid Trial Results for 2014 - A793-14
This publication reports the results of corn hybrid trials that were conducted by NDSU research and Extension personnel throughout North Dakota. The hybrids tested were entered voluntarily by the companies that market them, and the management of these trials was financed partially by the entry fee those companies paid.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
North Dakota Corn Hybrid Trial Results for 2015 - A793
This publication reports the results from the various corn hybrid trials conducted in ND during the 2015 growing season. Summary tables for each experimental location contain the yield and moisture at harvest of the hybrids tested.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
2016 Weed Control Guide - W253
The information in this guide provides a summary of herbicide uses in crops grown in North Dakota and is based on federal and state herbicide labels, research at ND Ag. Experiment Stations, and information from the North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Feeding Corn to Beef Cattle - AS1238
Corn commonly is used as a feed grain in beef cattle diets throughout the U.S. However, until recently in many parts of North Dakota and other northern-tier states, feeding corn was less common. With the availability and improvement of shorter-season corn varieties, corn plantings in North Dakota increased nearly five-fold from 1995 to 2012. In 2011, 216 million bushels of corn were produced. This has resulted in more interest in using corn as a feedstuff for beef cattle.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Handling Liquid Feed Commodities - AS1272
Liquid feeds are useful for conditioning rations, improving palatability, reducing dustiness and providing nutrients to livestock. Many liquid byproduct materials are available for use in beef cattle rations. In addition, a number of commercial liquid supplement products also are available.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Corn Growth and Management Quick Guide - A1173
Knowing the growth stages of corn allows growers to time field operations properly to meet windows of opportunity. Proper timing of fertilizer, irrigation, cultivation, harvest, and insect, weed and disease control can improve yields significantly.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Quality Forage: Silage Fermentation and Preservation - AS1254
High-quality silage is achieved when lactic acid is the predominant acid produced because it is the most efficient fermentation acid and will drop the pH of the silage the fastest. The faster the fermentation is completed, the more nutrients will be retained in the silage.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Creative Commons License
Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. Thanks.