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North Dakota Hard Red Spring Wheat Variety Trial for 2014 and Selection Guide - A574-2014
this publication provides data on the performance of hard red spring wheat varieties from trials conducted throughout ND. It is intended to be a resource to be used by farmers in selecting varieties that can perform well in their own farms.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Selecting a Sprinkler Irrigation System - AE91
The four basic methods of irrigation are: subsurface irrigation (“subirrigation,” which uses tile drain lines), surface or gravity irrigation, trickle irrigation (also called drip irrigation) and sprinkler irrigation. Of the acres currently irrigated in North Dakota, more than 80 percent use some type of sprinkler system. Statewide, the center pivot is the most popular sprinkler system.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
North Dakota Barley, Oat and Rye Variety Trial Results for 2015 and Selection Guide - A1049-15
This publication contains the results from multiple locations on the performance of adapted varieties of barley, oat and rye.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
North Dakota Barley, Oat and Rye Variety Trial Results for 2016 and Selection Guide - A1049-16
This publication contains the results from multiple locations on the performance of adapted varieties of barley, oat and rye.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Grain Stream Sampling and Sampler Construction - AE1044
Accurate grain sampling is equally important to both the producer and the buyer of grain. A grain sample is important because information from the sample is used to establish the quality characteristics and the value of the grain. Therefore, it is important that proper thought and attention be given to the method of collection, sample size, and frequency of sample collection per unit volume of grain.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Caught in the Grain! - AE1102
People can become caught or trapped in grain in three different ways: the collapse of bridged grain, the collapse of a vertical wall of grain, and entrapment in flowing grain. Moving or flowing grain is involved in all three. People who work with grain – loading it, unloading it, and moving it from bin to bin – need to know about the hazards of flowing grain and how to prevent a grain entrapment situation.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
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