Publications

Accessibility


Search results

18 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type













New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
2015 North Dakota Field Crop Fungicide Guide - PP622
This fungicide guide is based on the latest information available from the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station. U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the agricultural chemical industry.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
2015 Canola Variety Trials - A1124-15
The North Dakota Canola Variety Trial Results provide producers with data on canola performance throughout the state and gives information about yield and other information needed for accurate selection on canola hybrids for agricultural projection in North Dakota
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
2016 Weed Control Guide - W253
The information in this guide provides a summary of herbicide uses in crops grown in North Dakota and is based on federal and state herbicide labels, research at ND Ag. Experiment Stations, and information from the North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Bertha Armyworm in Canola - E1347
This publication summarizes Integrated Pest Management of bertha armyworm including identification, life cycle, crop damage, pheromone trapping, field scouting, economic threshold, cultural methods, biological control and chemical control.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Canola Production - A686
Canola has become a popular oilseed crop for North Dakota. The state leads the U.S. in canola production, with approximately 92 percent of domestic production. Canola is a specific edible type of rapeseed, developed in the 1970s, which contains about 40 percent oil. The term “canola” is a name registered by the Western Canadian Oilseed Crushers Association.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Canola Production Field Guide - A1280
Canola is a specific edible type of rapeseed, developed in the 1970s, which contains about 40 percent oil. The term “canola” is a registered name by the Western Canadian Oilseed Crushers Association. Canola varieties must have an erucic acid content of less than 2 percent and less than 30 micromoles of glucosinolates per gram of seed. This makes it acceptable as an edible oil and animal protein feed. Canola oil is considered one of the highest quality edible oils available. Canadian and U.S. farmers mostly grow low-erucic acid and low-glucosinolate varieties. High-erucic acid oil rapeseed is grown and used for industrial lubricants. This type of rapeseed mostly is grown in Europe, although some production occurs in Canada and the U.S.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Clubroot of Canola Alert - PP1700
Clubroot is caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae. The pathogen survives in the soil and infects the roots of canola and other Brassicae plants (such as broccoli, cauliflower, Shepherd’s purse and wild mustard), causing a galling and swelling, and giving them a “club” appearance.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Diamondback Moth in Canola - E1346
This publication summarizes Integrated Pest Management of diamondback moth including identification, life cycle, crop damage, pheromone trapping, field scouting, economic threshold, cultural methods, biological control and chemical control.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
FERTILIZING CANOLA and MUSTARD SF1122 (Revised)
This is an updated circular for a crop that is important to the livelihood of North Dakota framers north of highway 2, generally. All references to yield-based nutrient formulas are taken out of this revision.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Fertilizing Canola and Mustard - SF1122
Canola is an important crop in North Dakota. It is grown for its oil content for both food and fuel purposes. Nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) requirements of canola and mustard are similar to those of small grains. Sulfur (S) requirements for canola are higher than most crops. Soil test results direct fertilizer rates for N, P, K and S. Soil cores should be taken from 0 to 24 inches deep and divided into 0- to 6-inch and 6- to 24-inch samples. P and K should be analyzed on the 0- to 6-inch sample, while N and S should be tested on each depth.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Creative Commons License
Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. Thanks.