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Tobacco Rattle Virus in Potato (A1896)
Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) causes the economically important corky ring spot (CRS) disease in potato. Tobacco rattle virus is transmitted in the filed by soil-inhabiting stuffy root nematodes of the genera Trichodorus and Paratrichodorus.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Early Blight in Potato (PP1892)
Early blight of potato is caused by the fungal pathogen Alternaria solani. The disease affects leaves, stems and tubers and can reduce yield, tuber size, storability of tubers, quality of fresh-market and processing tubers and marketability of the crop.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
IPM Basics Integrated Pest Management in North Dakota Agriculture - PP863
This publication reviews what Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is for agriculture. Examples of different pest management strategies, such as cultural, host plant resistance, mechanical, biological and chemical are described. The steps of implementing IPM and its benefits are summarized.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Powdery Scab of Potatoes (PP1891)
Spongospora subterranea f. sp. subterranea (referred to as S. subterranea), the causal agent of powdery scab and root gall formation in potato, is a soil- and tuber-borne funguslike pathogen. S. subterranea first was reported in the U.S. in 1913. During this same year, the disease was found established in potato-growing states such as Maine, Florida, Minnesota and Oregon. To date, the pathogen can be found causing disease throughout the U.S., as well as several other potato-growing regions around the world.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Corn Ear Molds: Basic Questions and Answers - PP1451
Corn ear molds are of concern because of their potential to produce mycotoxins, which may affect livestock feeding value. The following provides some answers to frequent questions about corn ear molds.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Fusarium Yellows of Sugar Beet - PP1247
Fusarium yellows of sugarbeet was identified in the Red River Valley in a few fields between Moorhead, Minn., and Drayton, N.D., in 2002. Fusarium yellows is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae, although other Fusarium species can be involved as secondary invaders. The disease causes significant reduction in root yield and recoverable sucrose. In storage, the quality of infected roots may deteriorate more rapidly than in noninfected roots.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Plant Disease Management: Sugar Beet Powdery Mildew ( PP967 Revised)
Powdery mildew is a sporadic fungal leaf disease of sugar beet in the Red River Valley and southern Minnesota sugar beet-production areas. It first was found in Minnesota and North Dakota in 1975. In recent years, the use of triazole and strobilurin fungicides for Cercospora leaf spot control has limited powdery mildew development. Recent discoveries of the sexual stage of the powdery mildew fungus in several sugar beet producing states could lead to potential biological changes in the fungus, making it more difficult to control.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Soybean Disease Diagnostic Series (PP1867)
This series aids in disease identification.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Iron Chlorosis in Trees (F1868)
Iron chlorosis is a major tree-health issue found throughout the state. This document summarizes the biology and ecology of the issue, including susceptible species and soils most likely to create this problem. Soil treatments and stem injections are discussed.
Located in Lawns, Gardens & Trees
Iron Chlorosis in Trees (F1868)
Iron chlorosis is a major tree-health issue found throughout the state. This document summarizes the biology and ecology of the issue, including susceptible species and soils most likely to create this problem. Soil treatments and stem injections are discussed.
Located in Landing Pages / Gardens, Lawns & Trees
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