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It's All In Your Water 2013 Edition Reverse Osmosis - WQ1047
Reverse osmosis is a proven technology. One of the better known uses of RO is the removal of salt from seawater. Household RO units typically deliver small amounts (2 to 5 gallons per day) of treated water and waste three to seven times the amount of water treated.
Located in Home & Farm
Sump Pump Questions - AE1573
For many homeowners the first line of defense against water in the basement is a sump with a pump in it. The sump may be connected to drain tile that drains the footings of the house, under the entire basement, or just the area where the sump is located. Many houses have tiling installed only around a portion of the house. The water that drains into the sump must be removed, and this is accomplished with a sump pump.
Located in Landing Pages / Home & Farm
Soil, Water and Plant Characteristics Important to Irrigation - AE1675
Irrigation is the application of water to ensure sufficient soil moisture is available for good plant growth throughout the growing season. Irrigation, as practiced in North Dakota, is called "supplemental irrigation" because it augments the rainfall that occurs prior to and during the growing season.
Located in Landing Pages / Environment & Natural Resources
Water Quality of Runoff From Beef Cattle Feedlots - WQ1667
Runoff from feedlot may cause surface and groundwater pollution. Knowledge of runoff quality from beef cattle feedlot pens would be useful to design effective management practices to protect water quality. The objective of this bulletin is to share runoff quality measurements from three beef cattle feedlot pen surfaces under North Dakota management and climatic conditions.
Located in Landing Pages / Environment & Natural Resources
Water Needs and Quality Guidelines for Dairy Cattle - AS1369
Water availability and quality are important to animal health and productivity. Water is supplied by drinking, the feed consumed and metabolic water produced by the oxidation of organic nutrients.
Located in Landing Pages / Environment & Natural Resources
Filtration: Sediment, Activated Carbon and Mixed Media - WQ1029
Filtering your drinking water can be an inexpensive and simple method of removing many aesthetic problems such as odor and color.
Located in Landing Pages / Environment & Natural Resources
Drinking Water Quality: Testing and Interpreting Your Results - WQ1341
This publication will answer the following questions: • What should your water be tested for? • What samples do I need? • Where can I have my water tested? • How do I interpret my results? • How do I correct my problem?
Located in Landing Pages / Environment & Natural Resources
What's Wrong With My Water? Choosing the Right Test - WQ1352
Households using municipal or rural water supplies can depend on the utility to follow Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines for maximum levels of contaminants. An annual report is distributed to the users. Private well owners are not monitored by government agencies. This means the owner must take responsibility for the condition of the system. Routine testing establishes a water-quality record. If a contaminant problem develops, correlating the cause is easier if you keep a water-quality record.
Located in Landing Pages / Environment & Natural Resources
Oil and Fuel Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasure Program - WQ1486
The goal of the SPCC program is the prevention of oil spills into navigable waters of the United States and adjoining shorelines. By May 10, 2013, certain farms and other facilities must have an SPCC plan to prevent oil spills and a plan for cleanup and mitigation following a spill. If a farm or facility meets the defi nition of this regulation, it must have a plan.
Located in Landing Pages / Environment & Natural Resources
Baseline Water Quality in Areas of Oil Development - WQ1614
As oil development increases in North Dakota, private water well owners may be concerned about the quality and quantity of water they use or may use in the future.
Located in Landing Pages / Environment & Natural Resources
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