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From The Garden or Orchard to the Table: Jams and Jellies from North Dakota Fruits - FN590
What kinds of fruit can be successfully grown in North Dakota? What are some tested and tasty recipes for making the preserves? That’s what this circular is all about — growing and preserving the fruits of summer!
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Jellies, Jams and Spreads - FN172
Sweet spreads are foods with many textures, flavors and colors. They are thickened or jellied to varying degrees. The traditional jellies and jams are preserved primarily by sugar.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Jams and Jellies from Native (Wild) Fruits - FN1423
Many types of fruit and juices can be used to make jams and jellies. This guide provides recipes for several wild fruits, including buffalo berries, chokecherries, elderberries, gooseberries, ground cherries, pin cherries, rose hips and sand cherries. You may need to experiment a bit to get an acceptable product because of variations in the growing conditions and varieties of wild fruits.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Questions and Answers About Using a Boiling Water-bath Canner - FN1425
Water-bath canning is a method of preserving high-acid foods. Fresh foods contain a high percentage of water, which makes them very perishable. High-acid foods can be preserved safely when they reach temperatures provided by a boiling water-bath canner. To kill harmful molds, yeasts and some bacteria, processing using the boiling water-bath method ensures the safety of preserved produce. However, this method does not provide high enough temperatures to destroy botulinum spores in low-acid foods such as vegetables.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
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