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A Cow-calf Producer's Guide to Custom Feeding - AS1162
This publication will discuss items that a cow-calf operator should consider before choosing a feedlot to custom feed cattle. Custom feeding refers to the practice of sending calves, stockers or yearlings to a commercial feed yard for feeding to slaughter weights. Custom feeding is not without risks. It should be viewed as a potential means to add value to your calf crop and/or evaluate the genetic merit of your cow herd.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Forage Nutrition for Ruminants - AS1250
Plants utilized in the feeding of livestock have long been a fundamental link in the food chain. Native grasses supported grazing animals well before man began to domesticate livestock. Forages have always been an extremely important source of nutrients in livestock rations. Additionally, they provide fiber in the ration which enhances proper digestion in forage-consuming animals. Through their conversion into milk and meat products, forages continue to be one of the primary sources of nourishment in the human diet.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Sunflower Meal in Beef Cattle Diets - AS1623
Sunflower meal is the fourth largest source of protein supplement used for livestock behind soybean, cottonseed and canola meals (Hesley, 1994). Sunflower meal is the residual product when the oil fraction is removed from the black oil seeds by “crushing,” or more specifically, prepress solvent extraction. The supply of sunflower meal in the U.S. varies by year according to acres and yield of sunflowers harvested, with some seasonal variation in output. Most sunflowers are processed from October through March. Oil sunflowers generally are grown in the Great Plains region of the U.S.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Quality Forage: Haylage and Other Fermented Forages - AS1252
Cutting fresh forage at the optimal stage of maturity and feeding it directly to animals year-round would supply the highest-quality and most palatable feed possible. In addition, field and storage losses would be the least of all methods of forage utilization. However, fluctuations in seasonal growth and plant maturity make harvesting and storing forages necessary to maximize quality and productivity.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Feeding Corn to Beef Cattle - AS1238
Corn commonly is used as a feed grain in beef cattle diets throughout the U.S. However, until recently in many parts of North Dakota and other northern-tier states, feeding corn was less common. With the availability and improvement of shorter-season corn varieties, corn plantings in North Dakota increased nearly five-fold from 1995 to 2012. In 2011, 216 million bushels of corn were produced. This has resulted in more interest in using corn as a feedstuff for beef cattle.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Quality Forage: Interpreting Composition and Determining Market Value - AS1251
New knowledge in forage quality and animal feeding, and significant advances in improving the genetic potential of animals used to produce milk, meat and wool, improve efficiency and lower costs. However, to do this, today’s producer must be aware of and utilize the latest information on feed quality and feeding management.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Comparing Value of Feedstuffs - AS1742
Determining the nutrient concentration and cost of each nutrient in feedstuff s allows producers to evaluate ration quality and cost. In addition, cost determination can be very helpful when deciding which feed to purchase in cases of diff ering asking prices and nutrient quality. This publication is meant to be a step-by-step guide to calculating feed values to allow appropriate comparison of feedstuffs.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
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