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Fellowship Food: Nourishing the Body and the Soul - FN1449
Help people stay healthy by providing nourishing options. Many people shortchange themselves on fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Eating a diet rich in these foods can promote good health by helping reduce our risk of heart disease, cancer and other diseases. If you are bringing a dish to a potluck, consider providing the veggies, fruits or whole grains. Bring a large nutrient-rich salad with a variety of greens and sprinkle with dried fruit and nuts or seeds. Bring whole-grain bread or crackers.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Eating For Your Eye Health - FN709
We cannot change our genetic inheritance, but we can exercise and eat a diet rich in fruits and vegetables.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
What Color is Your Food? - FN595
People need different amounts of fruits and vegetables depending on their age, gender and amount of daily physical actiivity. Taste a rainbow of fruits and vegetables for better health.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Nourish Your Bones - FN1488
Keeping our bones healthy is a lifelong process. As we get older, our bodies may break down bone faster than we can make new bone. This can cause problems if our bones don’t have enough stored nutrients to keep them strong. Eating nutrient-rich foods and getting weight-bearing physical acti vity help keep our bones in good shape no matter what our age.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Nourish Your Joints - FN1489
Most of us experience some joint stiffness during seasonal changes. However, degenerative diseases such as arthritis can inhibit daily activities.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Nourish Your Skin - FN1572
A Healthy Skin Diet is Like the Heart-healthy Diet.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Nourish Your Digestive System - FN1606
Our large intestine (colon) is home to 100 trillion “friendly” bacteria. These bacteria help defend us against disease, make certain vitamins such as vitamin K, and help break down extra food residue that remains after digestion in the small intestine. This process is known as fermentation. Our bacteria can become imbalanced due to stress, diarrhea, changes in diet and antibiotics. Consuming fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, probiotics and prebiotics can help our bacteria stay within a healthy balance.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Nourish Your Mind and Body With Accurate Health Information: How to Sort Fact From Fiction - FN1697
We’re all bombarded with information about nutrition and/or health in magazines and newspapers, and on TV and online through social media, blogs and YouTube videos. Also, family and friends might share information with us. With all this information, how do we separate fact from fiction? What are the clues to reliable health information in today’s fast-paced world? This publication will help you sort through the vast amount of nutrition and health-related information that is available.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Questions & Answers About Fats in Our Diet - FN1685
Through the years, certain foods fall in and out of public awareness and favor. This certainly has been true of fats, such as those found in margarine and butter. For example, for a time, margarine was recommended instead of butter for health reasons; more recently, margarine has gotten bad press because it contains trans fat. The sometimes-conflicting messages in the media can create confusion, so this publication discusses the different types of fat and current research-based recommendations for health, and it answers common questions about dietary fats.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Questions and Answers About Sodium and Its Impact on Our Health - FN1686
Excessive sodium in our diet can increase our blood pressure, especially in salt-sensitive individuals. High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Heart disease and stroke are the first and fourth leading causes of death in the U.S., making cardiovascular disease responsible for one of every three deaths in the country.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
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