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North Dakota Dry Pea Performance Testing 2015 - A1469-15
The North Dakota Pea Variety Trial Results provide producers with data on Field Pea performance throughout the state and gives information about yield and other information needed for accurate selection of Dry Pea Varieties for agricultural production in ND.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
Pulses: The Perfect Food - FN1508
Pulses, which include chickpeas/garbanzo beans, dry peas and lentils, are increasingly being recognized for their role in promoting good health. Researchers have reported that regular consumption of pulses may reduce the risk of heart disease, diabetes and certain types of cancer. Pulses are a versatile, easy to-prepare ingredient that can be used in entrees, salads, breads and desserts.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Using More Pulse Foods In Your Diet - FN1714
Pulse foods are rich sources of protein, fiber, vitamins such as folate, and minerals such as iron and potassium. They are low in fat and sodium, and are naturally gluten- and cholesterol-free. Researchers have reported that regular consumption of pulses may reduce the risk of heart disease, diabetes and certain types of cancer. The purpose of this publication is to show how to use more pulse foods in your diet and provide tested recipes and two weeks of sample menus at the 1,800- and 2,100-calorie levels.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
North Dakota Dry Pea Variety Trial Results for 2013 and Selection Guide - A1469
Field pea fits well into small-grain rotations. The green- and yellow-seeded varieties are used for human consumption as dry split peas. Field peas also are used as protein concentrates for livestock and pigeon feeds. In North Dakota, pea yields are similar to hard red spring wheat yields. Field pea stems grow to a length of 33 to 36 inches, and the plant reaches maximum height at the early pod fill stage. A cool growing season (a mean temperature of 55 to 65 degrees) is necessary for optimum pea yields. Hot weather during flowering may result in a reduced seed set.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
North Dakota Dry Pea Performance Testing 2016 - A1469-16
The North Dakota Pea Variety Trial Results provide producers with data on Field Pea performance throughout the state and gives information about yield and other information needed for accurate selection of Dry Pea Varieties for agricultural production in ND.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
North Dakota Dry Pea Variety Trial Results for 2014 and Selection Guide - A1469-14
Dry pea (Pisum sativum L.), native to southwest Asia, was among the first crops brought under cultivation by man. The largest acreages of dry pea in the United States are in North Dakota, Idaho, Oregon and Washington. As a cool-season legume crop, it fits well into small-grain rotations. The green- and yellow-seeded varieties are used for human consumption. Dry peas also are used as protein concentrates for livestock and pigeon feeds. In North Dakota, pea yields generally are similar to or exceed spring wheat yield. Peas also can be used as a forage crop for hay, pasture or silage.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
North Dakota Dry Pea Variety Trial Results for 2012 and Selection Guide - A1469-2012
Field pea fits well into small-grain rotations. The green- and yellow-seeded varieties are used for human consumption as dry split peas. Field peas also are used as protein concentrates for livestock and pigeon feeds. In North Dakota, pea yields are similar to hard red spring wheat yields
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
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