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A Cow-calf Producer's Guide to Custom Feeding - AS1162
This publication will discuss items that a cow-calf operator should consider before choosing a feedlot to custom feed cattle. Custom feeding refers to the practice of sending calves, stockers or yearlings to a commercial feed yard for feeding to slaughter weights. Custom feeding is not without risks. It should be viewed as a potential means to add value to your calf crop and/or evaluate the genetic merit of your cow herd.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Cattleman's Guide to Feedlot Terminology - AS1161
This publication is intended to familiarize cow-calf producers with the terminology that feedlot managers may use when discussing custom feeding and feedlots.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Now Serving Lean Beef - FN711
Beef is a versatile menu item whether you’re cooking for one, two or a crowd. Beef provides protein, vitamins and minerals. A typical serving size for beef and other meat is 3 ounces, which is about the size of a deck of cards. A 3-ounce serving of lean ground beef has about 180 calories, 10 grams of fat and 15 percent of the daily recommendation for iron.
Located in Landing Pages / Food and Nutrition
Winter Management of the Beef Cow Herd - AS1564
Good winter management practices contribute to healthy and productive cattle, reasonable feed costs and humane care. This publication describes recommended management practices for beef cows during the winter.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Sunflower Meal in Beef Cattle Diets - AS1623
Sunflower meal is the fourth largest source of protein supplement used for livestock behind soybean, cottonseed and canola meals (Hesley, 1994). Sunflower meal is the residual product when the oil fraction is removed from the black oil seeds by “crushing,” or more specifically, prepress solvent extraction. The supply of sunflower meal in the U.S. varies by year according to acres and yield of sunflowers harvested, with some seasonal variation in output. Most sunflowers are processed from October through March. Oil sunflowers generally are grown in the Great Plains region of the U.S.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Preparing for a Successful Calving Season Nutrition, Management and Health Programs - AS1207
This publication provides information on: • Cow Nutrition Prior to Calving • Colostrum Management • Calving Season – Vaccinations • Parasite Control • General Management
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Dealing With Heat Stress in Beef Cattle Operations - AS1615
Being proactive is the best approach for dealing with heat stress in cattle. Once cattle are in a severe state of heat stress, you may be too late to help them. Interventions that cause animals to cool extremely rapid or animal distress could have disastrous consequences. Having a solid management plan in place to address heat stress could pay big dividends in the form of maintained animal performance during periods of heat and in avoiding death losses in severe cases.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Johne's Disease in Beef and Dairy Herds - V1209
Johne’s (pronounced “yo-knees”) disease is a chronic wasting disease in ruminants caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium, subspecies paratuberculosis. This bacterium is closely related to the bacterium that causes tuberculosis in cattle and humans. H.A. Johne, a German veterinarian, fi rst described this disease in 1895; his name is used as the common name for this disease, also known as paratuberculosis.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Calf Diarrhea (aka Scours) - V1630
Infectious calf scours is found in two forms: those involving excess secretion of fluids and electrolytes from the intestine (such as E. coli K99), and those that have reduced absorption from the intestine into the body (other types of E. coli, Salmonella, rotavirus, coronavirus, etc.).
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Options for Land Application of Solid Manure - NM1613
Based on the type of livestock facility, manure can be handled and stored as a liquid (less than 5 percent dry matter), slurry (5 to 10 percent dry matter) and/or solid (greater than 15 percent dry matter). Figure 1 shows the relative consistency of the various types of manure that common animal species excrete. Depending on manure consistency, manure application equipment and application methods differ significantly.
Located in Landing Pages / Crops
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