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Roundworms in Dogs and Cats - V1670
Canine and Feline Roundworm and Hookworm Infections: A Public Health Concern Domestic dogs and cats are capable of infecting humans with the eggs of canine and feline roundworms and hookworms shed in fecal matter. While these types of infections are uncommon, they are well-described in the medical literature and can, in some cases, be severe.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Echinococcus in Dogs and Cats - V1669
Echinococcosis is a disease caused by the infection of animals and humans with tapeworms belonging to the genus Echinococcus. An understanding of the parasite life cycle is important in reducing human and animal exposure.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
North Dakota Swine Health Recommendations: Organizers of Exhibits or Sales - AS1709
Swine health considerations are an important factor to consider when organizing a sale or exhibition. This publication provides information on swine health considerations when organizing events.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
North Dakota Swine Health Recommendations: Exhibitors of All Pigs Going to Exhibits or Sales - AS1708
Swine health considerations are an important factor to consider taking pigs to an exhibition or sale. This publication provides information on swine health considerations when attending sales and exhibitions.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Water Needs and Quality Guidelines for Dairy Cattle - AS1369
Water availability and quality are important to animal health and productivity. Water is supplied by drinking, the feed consumed and metabolic water produced by the oxidation of organic nutrients.
Located in Landing Pages / Environment & Natural Resources
Strangles - V541
Strangles, which also is known as horse distemper, is a highly contagious disease. The disease causes swelling of the lymph nodes under the jaw and immediate isolation of affected horses. Medical treatment varies widely and mid cases will usually resolve without any antibiotic treatment.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Alternative Feeds for Ruminants - AS1182
This publication provides a brief overview of possible feedstuffs for cattle and sheep producers along with general feeding recommendations.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Low-stress Cattle Working Facilities - AS1389
The livestock industry is working hard to minimize stress to animals during all stages of production. The recent renovation of the livestock-working facility at North Dakota State University’s Carrington Research Extension Center (CREC) may provide ideas to producers developing their own working facilities. The objectives of the renovation were to reduce stress to animals during processing, increase the labor efficiency and safety of herdsmen, and to enhancing research capability. The renovation plan was developed by the CREC livestock research faculty and staff, with the help of Tim Olson, CATL Resources, and manufactured by Ray Barnhardt of RB Mfg. and Sales. The new design was created to work within the existing physical setting, namely building size and orientation, animal entry point and access points for people. This publication is a synopsis of the renovation and functionality of the CREC animal working facility.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Forage Nutrition for Ruminants - AS1250
Plants utilized in the feeding of livestock have long been a fundamental link in the food chain. Native grasses supported grazing animals well before man began to domesticate livestock. Forages have always been an extremely important source of nutrients in livestock rations. Additionally, they provide fiber in the ration which enhances proper digestion in forage-consuming animals. Through their conversion into milk and meat products, forages continue to be one of the primary sources of nourishment in the human diet.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
Feeding Barley to Sheep - AS1624
Barley is a useful feedstuff for sheep. It contains a similar level of energy and higher level than corn. Barley is an excellent supplement to ewe diets during late gestation and lactation or when forage quality is low. Similarly, barley is a good grain source for lamb finishing; however, better feed management may be needed because it tends to ferment more rapidly than corn.
Located in Landing Pages / Livestock
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