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A Guide to North Dakota Noxious and Troublesome Weeds

This publication includes photos of all North Dakota state and county listed noxious weeds as well as "troublesome" plants such as poison ivy. Methods to identify and control each weed are discussed and why the plant is a concern in the state is explained. This is a pocket sized version of the publications W1411, Identification and Control of Invasive and Troublesome Weeds in North Dakota.

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Banded Sunflower Moth

This publication summarizes the life cycle, crop damage, and distribution of the banded sunflower moth. It explains monitoring and estimating damage potential, pheromone traps, chemical control and application timing, cultural control, biological control and host plant resistance.

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Basics of Corn Production in North Dakota

The basics of corn production in North Dakota provides information about corn production in the state. It addresses topics from abiotic stresses, soil fertility management, weed and insect control, diseases, as well as harvesting and storing corn.

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Buckwheat Production

This publication talks about growing buckwheat in North Dakota, from the adaption, rotation, variety selection and seeding to fertilizing, harvesting and marketing the crop. It also includes information on pests, weed control, and the average yield from different locations across the state.

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Caught in the Grain!

People can become caught or trapped in grain in three different ways: the collapse of bridged grain, the collapse of a vertical wall of grain, and entrapment in flowing grain. Moving or flowing grain is involved in all three. People who work with grain – loading it, unloading it, and moving it from bin to bin – need to know about the hazards of flowing grain and how to prevent a grain entrapment situation.

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Checklist of Potato Emergence Problems

At times, potato growers may experience poor emergence of potato plants. There are number of reasons why potato plants may not emerge properly. This article is intended to provide a list of common problems that can cause poor potato emergence and stand. Utilizing this list can help growers more rapidly identify the cause and improve management of the crop and subsequent crops.

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Common Arthropod Pests of Corn in North Dakota

This publication describes the common arthropod pests of corn in North Dakota. The following pests are included: northern and western corn rootworms, cutworms, European corn borers, grasshoppers, corn aphids, seed corn maggots, spider mites and white grubs (June beetles). To help pest managers with proper identification, a brief description and photograph of the immature and adult life stages is provided for each pest.

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Common Arthropod Pests of Soybeans in North Dakota

This publication describes the common arthropod pests of soybean in North Dakota. The following pests are included: foliage-feeding caterpillars (green cloverworm, painted lady butterfly), potato leafhoppers, soybean aphids, spider mites, armyworms, bean leaf beetles and cutworms. To help pest managers with proper identification, a brief description and photograph of the immature and adult life stages is provided for each pest.

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Common Natural Enemies of Insect Pests

This publication describes the most common natural enemies of insect pests that are found in field crops and gardens. Pictures of each natural enemy are provided for assistance with identification. Predators, parasitoids and entomopathogenic fungi and viral diseases are covered.

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Dry Bean Production Guide

Dry bean is a food crop that requires the producers to provide special cultural management and attention. Proper management is essential from cultivar selection, field selection and planting through harvest, plus marketing for maximum profitability. This guide helps producers meet those production challenges.

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Effectiveness of Using Low Rates of Plant Nutrients

This is a much delayed update to the original, which was a North Central Regional Publication 341, but the national AES doesn't support publications anymore, so this will be an NDSU publication. It includes use of low rates of planting time fertilizer with or near the seed, use of foliar fertilizers and approximate elemental composition of many regional crops.

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Evaluation of Soils for Suitability for Tile Drainage Performance

The presence of salts and high water tables in North Dakota soils due to an extended climactic wet cycle recently has stimulated interest in the installation of tile drainage systems. The tile controls the water table and encourages the leaching and removal of salts from the soil above the tile lines. This improves soil productivity, culminating in improved crop yields

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Fertilizing Malting and Feed Barley

The yield-based N rate formula has been terminated. These recommendations have been updated to reflect that yield and N rate are not related between environments. Also, N recommendations for western ND have been modified to incorporate the special requirements for achieving malting grade in that environment.

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Grain Stream Sampling and Sampler Construction

Accurate grain sampling is equally important to both the producer and the buyer of grain. A grain sample is important because information from the sample is used to establish the quality characteristics and the value of the grain. Therefore, it is important that proper thought and attention be given to the method of collection, sample size, and frequency of sample collection per unit volume of grain.

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Identifying Leaf Stages in Small Grain

This publication identifies leaf stages in small grains to help with the application of postemergence-applied herbicides. Knowing the leaf stages describes the optimum treatment time that will maximize weed control and minimize crop injury.

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