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Sanzida Rahman Defends M.S. Thesis

Sanzida Rahman successfully defended her Plant Sciences M.S. thesis, Differentiating PVY Infection from Nitrogen Deficiency Using Spectral Reflectance, July 12, 2019 at North Dakota State University.
Sanzida Rahman Defends M.S. Thesis

Sanzida Rahman (left) and advisor Dr. Asunta Thompson

July 25, 2019

Sanzida Rahman successfully defended her Plant Sciences M.S. thesis, Differentiating PVY Infection from Nitrogen Deficiency Using Spectral Reflectance, July 12, 2019 at North Dakota State University.

In Rahman’s study, the spectral signatures of ten potato cultivars were characterized for the first time in response to three nitrogen rates and two Potato Virus Y (PVYN:O) infection levels. She used spectral reflectance to differentiate the clean and infected samples under nitrogen deficiency and found that the cultivars differed in their responses. Given these results, Rahman emphasized the “importance of studying cultivar-specific spectral responses for the correct interpretation of spectral data in the future.”

Rahman, who is from Madaripur, Bangladesh, received her B.S. in Agriculture at Khulna University in Bangladesh and her Master of Biology specializing in human ecology at Vrije Universiteit Brussel in Belgium. She said she chose to pursue an M.S. in plant sciences at NDSU because of its reputation for “outstanding [agricultural] research.”

“The NDSU Department of Plant Sciences offers students a great environment to learn practical and professional skills. Everyone in this department is very friendly and helpful,” said Rahman.

During her studies at NDSU, Rahman was awarded the Charles and Linda Moses Presidential Graduate Fellow Scholarship (2017-18) and was inducted into Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society (2018). She also served as vice president of the Plant Sciences Graduate Student Association (2017).

She will begin a Ph.D. program in Plant Stress Biology at the University of Missouri in fall 2019.

Rahman was advised by Dr. Asunta Thompson, professor and leader of the potato breeding program in the Department of Plant Sciences. Her graduate committee also included Dr. Harlene Hatterman-Valenti and Dr. Aaron Daigh.

Author: Kamie Beeson, 701-231-7123,
Editor: Karen Hertsgaard, 701-231-5384,

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