Plant Sciences

Accessibility


| Share

Lucas Holmes Defends M.S. Thesis

Lucas Holmes presented his Plant Sciences M.S. thesis, “Tile Drainage, Beds, and Fe-EDDHA Application Effect on Soybean Production”, November 1, 2018 at North Dakota State University.
Lucas Holmes Defends M.S. Thesis

Lucas Holmes (left) and Dr. Hans Kandel

November 21, 2018

Lucas Holmes presented his Plant Sciences M.S. thesis, “Tile Drainage, Beds, and Fe-EDDHA Application Effect on Soybean Production”, November 1, 2018 at North Dakota State University. His advisor is Hans Kandel, professor and Extension agronomist in the Department of Plant Sciences.

Soybean is one of the major crops produced in the state of North Dakota. However, here in the Red River Valley of the North, certain conditions affecting the soil, such as flooding, cool temperatures, and high pH, have been shown to hinder soybean production. As a result, iron-deficiency chlorosis (IDC) is one of the main problems that can occur. Holmes contributed to the ongoing research in Kandel’s project, which showed that water management methods, such as subsurface tile drainage and raised beds, and nutrient deficiency management methods, such as the application of the iron-chelating compound Fe-EDDHA, can reduce IDC and improve soybean production. The additional data Holmes gathered support the recommendation that growers should select IDC-tolerant cultivars when growing soybean in IDC-prone soil.

Holmes, who is from Sioux Falls, SD, received his B.Sc. in Agronomy from South Dakota State University. He chose to pursue his master’s degree at the North Dakota State University Department of Plant Sciences because Kandel’s project was “a good blend of different areas of agronomy” and offered him the ability to “focus on genetic qualities as well as study different treatment effects on cropping systems.” He also appreciated the opportunity to be exposed to a variety of research projects and to work with other faculty and graduate students through Kandel’s collaborative work with Department of Plant Sciences professor and Extension agronomist Joel Ransom.

During his time at NDSU, Holmes participated in campus student organizations. He was the Plant Sciences Graduate Student Association philanthropist from 2013 to 2015. “This experience helped me develop professional skills and networking,” he said. He also was the volunteer chair at St. Paul’s Catholic Newman Center (2013-2015), and was a member of Chi Alpha (2013-2015).

Holmes has accepted a position with NDSU Extension in Williams County as an Agricultural and Natural Resources Extension Agent. In the future, he plans to pursue a Ph.D. and is interested in Extension and research work.

His graduate committee included Kandel, Ransom, Dean Steele, agricultural and biosystems engineering, and Derek Crompton, Channel Seed Company.

Author: Kamie Beeson, 701-231-7123,
Editor: Karen Hertsgaard, 701-231-5384,

Creative Commons License
Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. Thanks.