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Johanna V. Lukaschewsky Defends M.S. Thesis

Johanna V. Lukaschewsky successfully defended her Plant Sciences Master’s thesis, Productive and Economic Analysis of Silage Maize and Alfalfa Intercropping, on March 3, 2021, at North Dakota State University. She was advised by Dr. Marisol Berti, professor and leader of the forages and biomass crop production program.
Johanna V. Lukaschewsky Defends M.S. Thesis

Johanna Lukaschewsky (right) with advisor Dr. Marisol Berti

April 5, 2021

Johanna V. Lukaschewsky successfully defended her Plant Sciences Master’s thesis, Productive and Economic Analysis of Silage Maize and Alfalfa Intercropping, on March 3, 2021, at North Dakota State University. She was advised by Dr. Marisol Berti, professor and leader of the forages and biomass crop production program.

Lukaschewsky’s research evaluated the productivity, forage nutritive value, and stand establishment of alfalfa the year after being established in intercropping with maize at two maize row spacings compared with spring-seeded alfalfa. She also sought to determine if the application of a growth regulator to alfalfa under the maize canopy improves alfalfa establishment and survival. In addition, she calculated the economic benefits of alfalfa-maize intercropping. The results showed that alfalfa established in intercropping with maize had almost double the forage yield in the following year compared with spring-seeded alfalfa following a crop of silage maize. Intercropping maize and alfalfa did not affect forage nutritive value in alfalfa harvested the following year compared with spring-seeded alfalfa, except for crude protein and ash. In addition, the application of a growth regulator to alfalfa under the maize canopy did not improve alfalfa establishment and survival when intercropped with silage maize. Lastly, alfalfa intercropped with maize had higher net returns than a silage-maize followed by a spring-seeded alfalfa the following year.  

Lukaschewsky is originally from Coyhaique, Chile, and earned her bachelor’s degree in agricultural engineering with animal production from Universidad Austral de Chile. 

During her time at NDSU, she was inducted into the membership of the Gamma Sigma Delta Honor Society. 

She recommends North Dakota State University and the Department of Plant Sciences to prospective graduate students, saying, “The help and guidance from all the faculty members, other grad students and staff make your time at NDSU an excellent opportunity to learn and conduct research that gives you all the tools to complement your professional life.” 

In 2016, Lukaschewsky returned to Chile and is self-employed.

Her graduate committee included Berti, Dr. Joel Ransom, Dr. Burton Johnson, and Dr. David Ripplinger.

Author: Kamie Beeson,
Editor: Shannon Ueker,

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