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NDSU Horticulture Research Farm Field Day Set

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The Dale E. Herman Research Arboretum, which is part of NDSU's Horticulture Research Farm, has the largest collection of trees in the northern Plains. (NDSU photo) The Dale E. Herman Research Arboretum, which is part of NDSU's Horticulture Research Farm, has the largest collection of trees in the northern Plains. (NDSU photo)
The event will showcase research that benefits yards and gardens.

Fruits, vegetables and trees well-adapted to North Dakota’s growing conditions will be featured during a field day Aug. 9 at North Dakota State University’s Horticulture Research Farm near Absaraka.

The field day will run from 4 to 7:15 p.m.

The 80-acre farm in western Cass County includes the 35-acre Dale E. Herman Research Arboretum, which has the largest collection of trees in the northern Great Plains.

“The arboretum is truly a treasure for a prairie state such as North Dakota,” says Esther McGinnis, NDSU Extension Service horticulturist. “It contains more than 5,000 species, cultivars and selections of trees and shrubs.”

At 4 p.m., NDSU faculty and personnel will lead a riding tour to showcase research that will benefit yards and gardens. They will discuss fruit research, including hardy grape breeding and evaluation of raspberry, blackberry and Juneberry cultivars.

Vegetable gardeners will learn about organic production methods and the potential for a longer growing season in high tunnels. Cut-flower lovers will see high-tunnel trials of snapdragons, lisianthus, delphiniums and dahlias. The riding tour also will provide an overview of the extensive tree collection in the arboretum.

New this year, visitors will be able to interact with NDSU faculty giving short demonstrations at 5:15 p.m. on tree planting and pruning, common tree problems, grapevine maintenance and tomato diseases.

The field day will end with a one-hour arboretum tree walk led by Todd West, a professor in NDSU’s Plant Sciences Department, and Greg Morgenson, a research specialist in the department, at 6:15 p.m. They will discuss which trees thrive in North Dakota and current NDSU tree introductions.

A light dinner will be available after 5 p.m. until supplies run out.

Horticulture Research Farm Directions

  • From east/west: I-94 to Wheatland, then take Exit 324. Turn north on 149th Avenue/County Road 5. Shortly after driving through Wheatland, turn west onto 34th Street Southeast. Turn north onto 148th Avenue/County Road 5. At about 30th Street Southeast (just before the turn to Absaraka), the road changes to gravel at a slight curve. Continue north on 148th Avenue/County Road 5 for about 3/4 mile. Turn east onto 29th Street Southeast (field road, sign posted) and proceed 1/2 mile to the Horticulture Research Farm, which is bordered by trees.
  • From north/south: I-29 to Argusville, then take Exit 79. Turn west onto 25th Street Southeast/County Road 4 and travel approximately 20 miles. Turn south onto 148th Avenue/County Road 5 (gravel) and travel for approximately four miles. Turn east onto 29th Street Southeast (field road, sign posted) and proceed 1/2 mile to the Horticulture Research Farm, which is bordered by trees.

NDSU Agriculture Communication - July 28. 2017

Source:Esther McGinnis, 701-231-7406, esther.mcginnis@ndsu.edu
Editor:Ellen Crawford, 701-231-5391, ellen.crawford@ndsu.edu
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