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N.D. Crop Improvement and Seed Association Conference Set for Feb. 4-5 in Bismarck

The 63rd annual North Dakota Crop Improvement and Seed Association (NDCISA) meeting will be held at the Radisson Hotel in Bismarck on Feb. 4-5.

The conference begins on Feb. 4 with a seed allocation meeting at 8 a.m. followed by the NDCISA board of directors meeting at 9:30 a.m. On Feb. 5, there will be committee meetings, a business meeting, guest speakers and a luncheon.

Speakers include Elias Elias, North Dakota State University durum wheat breeder and university distinguished professor; Todd West, NDSU associate professor of horticulture and NDSU woody plant improvement program director; and Paul Schwarz, NDSU malting barley quality professor.

The Feb. 5 schedule, topics and speakers are:

  • 7:30 a.m. - registration
  • 8:15 a.m. - committee meetings
  • 9 a.m. - business meeting
  • 10:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. - guest speakers and luncheon
  • Durum wheat breeding and genetics in North Dakota - Elias
  • Why develop trees for a prairie: A look into the NDSU woody plant improvement program - West
  • Beer and barley in the U.S.: 1602-2015 - Schwarz

The conference is free and open to the public. However, registration is required. For more information or to register, contact Toni Muffenbier, NDCISA office manager, at (701) 231-8067 or email toni.muffenbier@ndsu.edu.


NDSU Agriculture Communication – Jan. 20, 2015

Source:Toni Muffenbier, (701) 231-8067, toni.muffenbier@ndsu.edu
Editor:Rich Mattern, (701) 231-6136, richard.mattern@ndsu.edu
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