You are here: Home Newsreleases Late-maturing Corn Issues Featured at NDSU Workshop
 
Document Actions

Late-maturing Corn Issues Featured at NDSU Workshop

Producers may be faced with harvesting corn that isn’t fully mature.

Late-maturing corn will be the focus of a workshop at North Dakota State University’s North Central Research Extension Center near Minot on Tuesday, Aug. 27.

The workshop will be held from 9 a.m. to noon, followed by lunch, at the research center headquarters.

“Corn is a crop that requires warm temperatures to grow and develop normally,” says Eric Eriksmoen, a research agronomist at the center. “Due to a season of cool, wet weather conditions, farmers are facing a very real possibility of harvesting corn that may not be fully mature. This may result in the need for additional drying prior to storage.”

The workshop is designed to help producers prepare for these conditions and will include presentations on corn production, harvest and marketing.

“We are bringing in experts who will discuss storage, drying and handling of wet corn; marketing corn with quality concerns; and crop insurance issues,” Eriksmoen says. “Farmers may be facing decisions like the break-even price for drying corn at various moisture levels, opportunities for marketing immature and high-moisture corn, and what federal crop insurance will cover for quality losses.”

The workshop also will include a demonstration on the use of drones to assist producers with crop production.

“This technology is still in its infancy, but the implications are very exciting,” Eriksmoen says.

The miniature aircraft can be equipped with various sensors that give instantaneous live images of production-related problems such as disease outbreaks, weed infestations and nutrient deficiencies. In the very near future, producers will be able to get an instantaneous bird’s-eye view of their crop and will be able to make more efficient management decisions based on what these sensors tell them.

Workshop presenters include Frayne Olson, NDSU Extension Service crops economist and marketing specialist; Ken Hellevang, NDSU Extension agricultural engineer; Mitchell Fiene, DMZ Aerial; and Robert Klein, Extension cropping systems specialist at the University of Nebraska, who will discuss production issues including row spacing and plant populations.

The North Dakota Corn Growers Association is co-sponsoring the workshop. Attending the event is free of charge.

For additional information, contact the North Central Research Extension Center at (701) 857-7677.

The center is one mile south of Minot on U.S. Highway 83.


NDSU Agriculture Communication - Aug. 16, 2013

Source:Shana Pederson, (701) 857-7682, shana.pederson@ndsu.edu
Editor:Ellen Crawford, (701) 231-5391, ellen.crawford@ndsu.edu
Columns
2016 4-H State Fair Results: 4-H'ers Awarded for State Fair Static Exhibits  (2016-08-08)  Youth receive recognition for their exhibits in a number of categories.  FULL STORY
Spotlight on Economics: Spotlight on Economics: Further Declines in N.D. Cropland Values Likely  (2016-08-23)  A further decline in North Dakota cropland values will occur for the 2016 year. Will land values decline in 2017? Probably, although markets can change abruptly.   FULL STORY
BeefTalk: BeefTalk: Frame Score 3 May Calves Put 1,400 pounds of Beef on the Rail  (2016-08-25)  Smaller calves are marketable and acceptable.  FULL STORY
Prairie Fare: Prairie Fare: Exploring Nutrition Along the Lewis and Clark Trail  (2016-08-25)  Corn and squash helped sustain Lewis and Clark during their winter in North Dakota.  FULL STORY
Small-business Savvy: Small-business Savvy: Identify Yourself as a Small-business Owner  (2016-08-18)  Small-business ownership is an attitude and an identity.  FULL STORY
 
Use of Releases
The news media and others may use these news releases in their entirety. If the articles are edited, the sources and NDSU must be given credit.
 

Powered by Plone, the Open Source Content Management System