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Small Fruit Varieties

Raspberries
(Summer Bearing)

Nordic (Red): Compares to `Boyne’ in fruit size, quality and yield; firmer berry with a tougher skin and better flavor. Better for freezing and more disease resistance especially to anthracnose. Has a lighter fruit color and shorter, less thorny canes than `Boyne’; ripens slightly earlier. Heavy early summer crop and very light fall crop which is too late for our area.

Boyne (Red): Most popular cultivar in our area. Fruit is dark red, medium large in size and fairly soft. The flavor is aromatic and medium acid. Good for processing, freezing and fresh eating. Canes are medium height (5-5'), vigorous, very hardy and productive. Can be grown without supports. Has largely replaced Latham because of greater disease resistance.

Latham (Red): Large, light red, moderately firm fruits: acceptable for processing and freezing. Berries may crumble in some seasons; ripen over a long period. Canes lack the hardiness of `Boyne’ and should be given winter protection or planted in a well protected site; must be topped or supported. Susceptible to Mosaic.

Killarney (Red): Very hardy but slightly less vigorous and productive than `Boyne’; fruits are firmer and larger with a slightly better quality. Excellent fresh or frozen. Canes are about the same height as Boyne; support is recommended. Ripen a week later than `Boyne’.

Nova (Red): Medium large, bright red, firm fruits; good for fresh use and freezing. Vigorous but border line in hardiness; need good winter protection. Canes tolerates fluctuating winter temperatures; nearly spineless and resistant to most cane diseases. Ripens in mid season.

Haida (Red): Medium sized, moderately firm fruits; larger, firmer and sweeter than `Boyne’. Suckers prolifically and must be thinned to assure good sized fruits. Needs optimum soil nutrients and nitrogen to attain good growth. Borderline in hardiness; need good winter protection. Ripens later than other cultivars.

Bababerry (Red), Canby (Red), Hilton (Red), Newburgh (Red) and Titan (Red) : Not hardy.

Black Hawk (Black): Medium-large fruits nearly rough with shinny black skin. Fruits maintain size throughout the 10-14 day picking season. Berries are firm, don't crumble and are sweet to mildly acid. Quality and flavor are good. Borderline in hardiness; needs winter protection. Arched canes bend over and root at the tips; new plants grow. Don't sucker. Resistant to anthracnose.

Bristol (Black), Jewel (Black) and John Robertson (Black): Very borderline in hardiness.

Allen (Black) and Cumberland (Black): Not hardy.

Royalty (Red-Purple): Large berries with superior flavor; can be picked at the full red stage with red raspberry flavor or allowed to ripen to a deep purple for the stronger sweet purple raspberry flavor. It is sweeter, hardier and has less erect canes than `Brandywine’. Soft mushy berries; fine fresh or used in preserves. Purples will out produce reds but are not as hardy; need winter protection. Plant 30" apart; will not fill in. Propagate like blacks; will not sucker.

Brandywine (Red-Purple): Large, round-conic, reddish-purple fruits. Firm, slightly tart and has excellent quality for jam and fresh. Will out produce the reds. Plants are vigorous and productive. Canes are large, very erect and seldom bend over with fruit. Less hardy than the reds; need winter protection. Plant 30" apart; will not fill in. Propagate like blacks; will not sucker.

Raspberries
(Fall Bearing)

Double Delight (Red): Medium large fruits; sweet, tart with a good "raspberry" flavor. Tendency for twin fruits to develop from one flower. Fairly erect but short (3-4') canes; height effected by location and growing condition. Hardy; earliest fruiting. Morden introduction.

Autumn Bliss (Red): Large oval-conic fruits; dark red color with pleasant rather mild flavor. Firm and easy to harvest. Earlier ripening and out yields `Heritage'; 50% of fruit during first 3 weeks of harvest. May want to cut all canes in the spring and get a larger and earlier fall crop. Resistant to Mosaic.

Fallred (Red): Medium sized red fruit with good flavor but are soft. Fruit stems are brittle and break easily. Canes are vigorous, upright, produce suckers freely and are nearly thornless; tend to break easily and need support. With our short growing season two crops may not be possible. May want to cut all canes down in the spring and get a heavier, earlier fall crop. Two weeks earlier than Heritage.

Red Wing (Red): Medium sized red fruits. Superior to `Fallred’ in yield and fruit firmness. Two weeks earlier than Heritage with slightly larger and somewhat softer berries; usually yields less. Stands up to summer heat and sun better than `Heritage’; hardy. May want to cut all canes in the spring and get a larger and earlier fall crop. Resistant to mosaic.

Summit (Red); Small-medium size, round fruits; firm, attractive and medium red color. Easy separation from the receptacle. Ripens 10-14 days earlier than `Heritage'. Excellent flavor and high yielding. Good fresh market and processing qualities. May want to cut all canes in the spring and get a larger and earlier crop in the fall.

Fallgold (Gold): Yellow fruits with excellent quality and flavor. Has all the traits of red raspberries except for fruit color and a milder taste. Not as hardy or productive as the reds; must have winter protection.

Amity (Red): Fruits are fairly dark red and medium sized; quite firm and have a tendency to adhere to the receptacle. Seven days earlier than `Heritage’. Good for fresh use and processing. Canes are 5-5.5' tall and nearly smooth; borderline in hardiness. Moderate yield. Resistant to Mosaic and spur blight. May want to cut all canes in the spring and get a larger and earlier crop in the fall.

Heritage (Red): Fruit is medium sized, red and very firm; good flavor and excellent quality. Canes are tall, vigorous, borderline in hardiness and sucker prolifically; very erect and sturdy requiring no support. May want to cut down all the canes in the spring and get one good crop.

Strawberries
(Early Junebearing)

Annapolis: Fruit is large, firm and light red in color; holds it size well through later harvests. Good for dessert and freezing quality. Plants have medium vigor and good hardiness. Susceptible to leaf spot, leaf scorch and wilt.

Crimson King: Large, medium firm berries with very good texture and mild flavor. Plants are very vigorous with high yield potential and excellent hardiness. Good freezing quality. Resistant to leaf diseases; susceptible to wilt.

Earliglow: Hardiness may be a problem.

Veestar: Bright medium red fruit with a slightly pale center and medium size; soft with very good flavor. Good for fresh use, freezing and jam. Plants have good vigor, runner well and are productive. In North Dakota trials, somewhat less productive than `Redcoat’. Good hardiness. Moderately resistant to Verticillium wilt; susceptible to red stele and leaf scorch.

Strawberries
(Early-Midseason Junebearing)

Honeyoye: Large bright red glossy fruits with good firmness, texture and flavor. May tend to off flavor in heavy clay soil. Good dessert and freezing quality. Plants are very vigorous; high yield potential and good hardiness. Resistant to leaf diseases with some resistance to powdery mildew and fruit rots. Susceptible to red stele and Verticillium wilt.

Mesabi: Large firm berries that are red all the way through; good flavor. Good hardiness; good disease and root rot resistance. New cultivar; not well evaluated.

Redcoat: Medium sized, light red, glossy fruits; medium firmness with a light interior. Fruits hold their size well throughout the harvest season. Use for freezing and jam; fair fresh flavor. Plants are vigorous, tall and very productive; runners are freely produced. Very good hardiness. Resistant to powdery mildew; susceptible to red stele, Verticillium wilt and leaf spot.

Surecrop: Medium-large firm fruits with light red interiors and medium red exteriors; firm fruits. Average to above average yields. Good dessert quality with sub-acid taste; freezing. Very vigorous; may produce too many runners. Thinning may be necessary to insure a good yield. Resistant to red stele, Verticillium wilt and leaf diseases.

Trumpeter: Medium-large bright red fruits. Flesh is intense red throughout and soft with a good flavor. Fruits ripen within a short time. Dessert and freezing qualities are good. Plants are tall, vigorous and very hardy. Less productive than `Redcoat’ in North Dakota trials. Resistant to Verticillium wilt; susceptible to red stele and leafspot.

Strawberries
(Late-Midseason Junebearing)

Allstar: Hardiness may be a problem.

Cavendish: Large firm fruits with excellent texture and good flavor; very good dessert and freezing quality. Good hardiness; resistant to red stele and leaf diseases.

Dunlap: Medium sized fruit with a rich red color. Use fresh; too soft for freezing and preserving. Many runners; must keep thinned. Good hardiness. Resistant to leaf diseases; susceptible red stele.

Glooscap: Medium-large glossy red fruits; firm with very good dessert and freezing qualities. Excellent hardiness and very good flavor; high yielding. Vigorous plant maker; does best in cool climates. Resistant to leaf diseases; susceptible to red stele.

Guardian: Hardiness may be a problem.

Jewel: Large, very firm, wedge-shaped fruits; very good texture and flavor. Very good dessert and freezing qualities. Good hardiness and high yielding plants. Resistant to leaf diseases; susceptible to red stele and wilt.

Kent: Large, dark red fruits with good firmness and texture. Lighter in color and milder in flavor than Honeyoye. Good quality for desserts and freezing. Plants are vigorous with good runner production. Good hardiness and yield potential. Heavy mulch recommended; fruits tend to rest on ground. Resistant to leaf diseases; susceptible to mildew, red stele and wilt.

Strawberries
(Late Season Junebearing)

Sparkle: Medium small, bright red fruits. Flesh is intense red throughout; somewhat soft with very good flavor. Very good dessert quality; excellent for freezing. Vigorous plants which produces runners freely; tend to overcrowd. Good hardiness and yield potential. Resistant to red stele; susceptible to Verticillium wilt, and leaf diseases. Cyclamen mites can be a problem.

Winona: Large firm fruits; excellent texture and flavor. Very good dessert quality and for freezing. Plant produces a large crown; good runner producer. Good hardiness. Resistant to red stele, mildew and leaf diseases. New cultivar; not well evaluated.

Strawberries
(Everbearing & Day Neutrals)

Tristar: Small to medium sized, glossy red fruits. Moderately firm flesh and skin; very good flavor and texture. Heavy spring crop; summer crops cycle about every six weeks with a decrease in fruit size as heat and dryness increase. Medium sized plants of moderate vigor. Tip of berry often green when fruit is ripe. Hardiness may be a problem; winter protection is necessary. Resistant to red stele, Verticillium wilt and powdery mildew.

Tribute: Medium sized, wedge shaped, glossy bright red fruits. Flesh and skin are firm; flavor is acidic but pleasant. More vigor but slightly later than `Tristar’; similar fruiting cycles. Yield and size decrease in hot dry. Hardiness may be a problem; winter protection is needed. Plant size is medium. Resistant to red stele, powdery mildew and Verticillium wilt. Iron chlorosis and berry rot seem to be a problem.

Ogallala: Soft small to medium sized dark red fruits. Sweet with good flavor and good for freezing. Berries ripen early; two crops a year. Plants are vigorous and very winter hardy. Older plants tend to be less productive. Resistant to leaf spot; susceptible to red stele and anthracnose.

Fort Laramie: Medium-large, bright red, medium soft berries with a sweet and pleasant flavor. Good for freezing. Light crop in June; heavier crop in the fall. Good winter hardiness. Plants are very productive, resistant to leaf spot, but susceptible to powdery mildew and anthracnose.

Ozark Beauty: Poor producers in this area; may get flower bud damage during the winter.

Currants

Perfection: Berries are red and mature early to mid season. Hardy but the canes have a tendency to break easily.

Red Lake: Berries are large and dark red with a pleasant mild flavor and good quality. Clusters are above medium size and compact. Bushes are nearly erect (3-5'), very productive and moderately vigorous. Ripening period from early to mid season. Fruits are good for jams and jellies. Very hardy; self fertile. Susceptible to powdery mildew; white pine blister rust may be a problem.

Crusader: Canadian black currant cultivar is resistant to white pine blister rust; may be worthy of trial. Vigorous grower (5-7') producing dark black berries; strong flavored when fresh but very good for jam or jelly. Not self fertile; require a pollinator. Moderately susceptible to powdery mildew.

Consort: Canadian black currant cultivar is resistant to white pine blister rust; may be worthy of trial. Fruits are medium in size and borne in clusters; strong flavored when fresh but very good for jam or jelly. Plants (5-7') are very productive and self fertile; ripen late in the season. Moderately susceptible to powdery mildew.

Gooseberries

Captivator: Medium sized fruit with a reddish tinge and a good flavor; semi-thornless. Hardy.

Hinnomaki Red: Dark red medium sized fruit on upright plants; Outer skin is tangy while the flesh is sweet. Reported to be mildew resistance with a flavor better than American cultivars. Begins fruiting in planting year. Hardiness may be a problem.

Pixwell: Berries are of medium size, light red when ripe and of a fairly good quality. Makes fine jam. Long stems make picking easy; relatively few thorns. Bushes are moderately vigorous and very productive.

Welcome: Berries are medium large in size and of good quality. Flavor is mildly tart; color is a light dull red. Bushes are vigorous, medium upright, becoming spreading; spines are scarce, very short, weakly attached and missing from older wood. Very susceptible to powdery mildew. Ripens early in the season.

Grapes

Valiant: Very Hardy; may be left on trellis over winter and pruned in the spring. Small berries are bluish-black in color; better quality than 'Beta’ with larger clusters. Good quality juice and jelly but unsuitable for wine. Matures earlier than 'Beta'. Must be pruned for good fruit production. Susceptible to mildew. Matures in mid-late August.

Foch (Marechal Foch): Clusters and bunches are of small size. Its small blue-black fruits produce a good quality Burgundy type red wine without blending. One of the hardiness French-hybrid cultivars available; borderline in hardiness. Prune in the fall, take off trellis and cover for the winter. Don't over prune. Tends to have excessive vigor in rich soils. Susceptible to powdery mildew. Mid-late August. Severe bird damage.

Himrod: Large, loose straggly clusters of medium sized, nearly seedless, yellow-green fruits; best quality seedless for north. Table variety. Vines are vigorous, productive and very borderline in hardiness. Prune in the fall, take off trellis and cover for the winter. Susceptible to powdery mildew. Ripens in late August.

Interlaken Seedless: Fruit is small and greenish-yellow in color. Flesh is sweet and crisp. Seedless and non-slipskin. Cluster is medium in size and tapering. Excellent quality; table use. Moderate vine vigor; productive and very borderline in hardiness. Not as hardy as `Himrod'. Prune in the fall, take off trellis and cover for the winter. Susceptible to mildew. Matures in late August. Birds may be a problem.

Kay Gray: White good quality grape for table use; juicy and sweet with low acid. Medium sized berries are produced in small clusters on very productive vines. Makes a mild and fruity wine; not the best for wine. Borderline in hardiness. Prune in the fall, take off trellis and cover for the winter. Good diseases resistance. Matures in late August.

Reliance: Red fruit with larger size than `Canadice'; good storage quality. Coloring may be poor in some years; fruit often cracks in wet conditions. Table grape. Appears to be the hardiest of the seedless varieties but requires winter protection. Prune in the fall, take off trellis and cover for the winter. Tolerant of several fungal diseases. Matures in late August.

Bluebell: Medium size, blue fruits; sweeter and larger than `Beta’ and `Valiant’ but not as hardy. Resembles `Concord’ in size, use and color, but the skin is much more tender; better table quality than Concord but produces a lighter juice. Good for fresh eating, juice and jelly. Border line in hardiness. Prune in the fall, take off trellis and cover for the winter. Ripens in early September.

Canadice: Medium sized, red dessert grape; seedless and firm. Borne on large, long compact, well filled clusters. Neutral, sweet flavor with good quality. Vines are productive and disease resistant. Has nor been a good performer to date. Very borderline in hardiness; one of the more hardy seedless cultivars. Prune in the fall, take off trellis and cover for the winter. Ripens in early September.

Edelweiss: Medium sized white fruits; sweet and pleasantly flavored. Medium to large loose clusters. Primarily a table grape, but makes an acceptable dry wine. Fruit must be picked promptly or it develops a strong taste. Fruit does not handle or store well. Vines are vigorous and productive. Borderline in hardiness; hardier than 'Swenson Red'. Prune in the fall, take off trellis and cover for the winter. Disease resistant. Ripens in early September.

Frontenac: Small fruits produced in large loose clusters; hardiest wine grape bred by Minnesota. Makes an excellent red wine. Good grower with resistance to downy and powdery mildew. Border line in hardiness. Prune in the fall, take off trellis and cover for the winter. Ripens in early September.

Worden: Bluish-black colored sweet grape; slightly larger than 'Concord'. Medium large clusters of fruit; quality of 'Concord'. Subject to fruit cracking in wet years. Hang on to the stem better than Fredonia but are not as sweet. Excellent for juice and fresh eating. Vines are vigorous, productive and borderline in hardiness; hardier than 'Concord'. Prune in the fall, take off trellis and cover for the winter. Mildew resistant. Ripens in early September.

Beta: Bunches and berries are small; fruit is blue-black in color. Too sour for eating but good for jelly; poor quality wine. Old and well known cold hardy variety. Vines are vigorous and productive, if pruned. May be left on the trellis over winter and pruned in the spring. Matures in mid September.

Swenson Red: Fruit is large, round and red; texture is crisp but tender. Clusters are medium-large and compact. Good flavor and stores well. Good table grape; thin skin, meaty texture and only 2 or 3 small seeds. Vines are vigorous and productive; borderline in hardiness. Must be taken off trellis and covered for winter. Prune in fall. Susceptible to downy and powdery mildew. Ripens in mid-September.

St.Croix: Berries are low in acid and similar to `Beta' in color and size; productive vines. Without pruning will over produce. Wine tends to be bland or neutral in character; mainly used for wine. Borderline in hardiness; must be taken off trellis and covered for winter. Matures in mid-September.

Fredonia: Fruits are blue-black in color and large with a tough and thick skin. Earlier, milder flavor, larger fruits and poorer quality than 'Concord'. Clusters are compact and small to medium sized. Quality is good for jelly and table use; yields a dark red wine with a strong 'foxy' aroma similar to 'Concord'; fair quality. Vines are vigorous and fairly productive, but susceptible to powdery mildew. Borderline in hardiness; must be pruned, taken off the trellis and covered for the winter. Ripens in mid-September.

Concord and Seyval Blanc: Too late here.

Blueberries

Chippewa: 1996 'Half-high' introduction from Minnesota. Medium sized dark blue fruit with a good flavor. More upright growing (30-40") and a sweeter berry than `Northblue’; similar yield. 3-5 lbs per plant; needs a pollinator. Glossy green leaves turning red in the fall. Use nets for bird control. Hardy but winter protection (snow cover) increases the yields significantly. Require an acid soil with a pH of 4.5 to 5.5; not recommended for ND or western Mn.

St. Cloud: 1990 'Half-high' introduction from Minnesota. Small to medium sized fruit; flavor and firmness superior to ‘Northblue’. 2-4 lbs per plant. Plants are 30-48 " in height; need a pollinator. Use nets for bird control. Hardy but winter protection (snow cover) increases the yields significantly. Require an acid soil with a pH of 4.5 to 5.5; not recommended for ND or western Mn.

Northcountry: 1988 'Half-high' introduction from Minnesota. Small dark blue fruits with a good blueberry taste. Average 2-4 lbs per plant; partially self fruitful. Glossy green leaves turning red in the fall. Plants 18-24" high. Use nets for bird control. Hardy but winter protection (snow cover) increases the yields significantly. Weekly picking for a 2-3 week harvest. Require an acid soil with a pH of 4.5 to 5.5 for best results, not recommended for ND or western Mn.

Polaris: 1996 'Half-high' introduction from Minnesota. Fruit is slightly smaller and yields slightly less than ‘Northblue’; very aromatic, firm berry with excellent flavor. Average 3-5 lbs per plant; stores 6-8 weeks. Plants 30-40" in height; needs a pollinator. Use nets for bird control. Hardy but winter protection (snow cover) increases the yields significantly. Require an acid soil with a pH of 4.5 to 5.5 for best results, not recommended for ND or western Mn.

Northsky: 'Half-high' variety. Sky blue, small fruits with a heavy dust bloom; excellent sweetness and flavor. Average 1-3 lbs fruit per plant. Leaves and fruits are smaller than 'Northblue'; dark green in color with good fall color. Plants 10-18" high. Use nets for bird control. Hardy but winter protection (snow cover) increases the yields significantly. 4-5 week harvest. Require an acid soil with a pH of 4.5 to 5.5 for best results; not recommended for ND or western Mn.

Northblue: 'Half-high' variety. Large, attractive, dark blue fruits; larger than other varieties. Firm; good fresh or processed. Large, glossy, dark green leaves which turn red in the fall. Average 3-5 lbs of fruit per plant; completely self fruitful. Plants are 20-25" tall. Use netting for bird control. Hardy but winter protection (snow cover) increases the yields significantly. Pick weekly for a 4-5 week harvest. Should begin in late July. Require an acid soil with a pH of 4.5 to 5.5 for best results; not recommended for ND or western Mn.

Bluecrop, Blueray, Bluetta, Northland, Patriot and Rancocas: Lack hardiness


Todd Weinmann, Extension Horticulturist & Master Gardener Coordinator
Phone: (701) 241-5707
E-mail: todd.weinmann@ndsu.edu

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