NDSU Extension - Grand Forks County

Accessibility


| Share

Volume 33, Issue 06 | July 16th, 2020

Heading

Download the pdf: Volume 33 | Issue 06, July 16th, 2020

PROJECT SAFESEND—DISPOSE OF PESTICIDES SAFELY

 Project Safe Send is underway again this year, with pesticide being accepted for disposal next week in Larimore. See locations below; full details on the NDDA website.

Contact Jeremiah Lien at jjlien@nd.gov or 701-425-3016 to pre-register. See a full list of sites at NDDA Site.

NOTE - NEW THIS YEAR: Shuttles are not accepted and a maximum of 3,000 pounds of pesticides per participant will be accepted.

2020 Project Safe Send Sites

8 am - 12 pm (local time) at North Dakota Department of Transportation (NDDOT) facilities

 

GRAND FORKS WEED BOARD NOTICE—CHEMICAL COST SHARE

The Grand Forks County Weed Board will be offering cost share  chemicals to registered landowners.  A current license is required to purchase Tordon.  Cost share chemicals will be Amine, Freelexx, Curtail, Milestone, Tordon, and Overdrive.

Please contact:         

Kevin

1637 15th Avenue NE (1/2 mile west of CR #5 and 32nd Ave S)

Grand Forks, ND 58201

218-779-4709

Chemicals will be available Monday, August 3, 2020 through Friday,  August 7, 2020 from 7:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.

 

 

 

SOYBEAN

NOW IS THE TIME TO TAKE FIELD NOTES ON IRON DEFICIENCY CHLOROSIS (IDC)

Hans Kandel, NDSU Extension Agronomist recommends taking note now of fields that experienced IDC in soybean. Were beans able to come out of IDC? How long were they chlorotic and how severe? Any surprising areas in the field chlorotic? Many soybean varieties have an IDC score; comparing your experience with their score can help you make variety selection decisions in the future. IDC alone can easily rob you of bushels/ac, on top of other environmental factors. NDSU IDC notes are published around August every year. Check out last year’s here on page 6 and 7.

 

KEEP SCOUTING FOR SOYBEAN APHID

Soybean Aphid has been minimal to unseen this year so far. This speed scouting form developed by Iowa State can help you determine economic threshold quickly.

Economic Threshold:

-R1 (beginning of flowering) to R5 (beginning seed) = 250 aphids/plant when populations are actively increasing in 80% of field. 

-R6 (full seed) = No treatment necessary. Research trials throughout the north central states have not demonstrated a yield benefit to treating soybean for soybean aphid management at the R6 and later stages.

Insecticide (pyrethroid) resistance is a concern in soybean aphid populations, and scouting should be done regularly.

 

 Source: 2020 Field Crop Insect Management Guide

 

WHEAT

ARMYWORMS

Reports of Armyworms are common this year, with isolated infestations being heavy and warranting insecticide application.  Grant Mehring, with WestBred Wheat posted a great video on Twitter showing a graveyard of armyworms on wheat heads near Thompson, ND; he suspected they were being parasitized by wasps or controlled by heat, and will check back again in coming weeks. 

It’s important to keep monitoring for armyworms as a few scattered may not warrant an insecticide application, but damage can be severe in some cases.  Armyworms primarily feed on small grains, corn and grasses, but will attack a number of other crops including alfalfa, beans and sugarbeet. They feed at night and hide during the day, so check under leaf littler, or loose soil, and look for their droppings laying in litter.

Armyworms feed for 3-4 weeks in a field, generally not moving unless they run out of food; where they will move in “armies” eating vegetation. The use of insecticides is a common and effective method for the management of economic populations. Late spraying mature (1.25+inches) armyworms often is referred to as “revenge” spraying because the crop damage already has been done, they are reaching a non-feeding stage and no economic benefit is realized.

Armyworm economic threshold in wheat that is heading is two or more larvae per square foot, if worm is between 0.75 and 1.25 inches long. When larvae are larger than 1.25 inches, no insecticide is recommended because larvae are mature and will be pupating (nonfeeding, resting stage) soon (Figure 1). In this situation, the damage already is done.

Read more on the armyworm lifecycle and E.T. in other crops in the NDSU Extension Armyworm Publication.

 

Creative Commons License
Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. Thanks.