Food and Nutrition

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EFNEP/SNAP-ED

The NDSU Extension Service offers the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) to low resource North Dakota families in four urban areas and on three reservations. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) works to increase the likelihood that SNAP eligibles will make healthy food choices with a limited budget and choose physically active lifestyles.

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Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)

EFNEP is a nutrition education program for families with young children. 

Families enroll in EFNEP and learn about healthy food choices, food safety and stretching the food dollar through a series of lessons.

EFNEP 2019 Program Impacts

Adult EFNEP reached 97 adults with 58 graduates completing five or more lessons. This programming benefitted 391 family members. Youth EFNEP reached 781 youth in 2019, with 94% of them graduating with five or more lessons. EFNEP graduates reported improved health and food resource management practices including:

  • 93% of adult graduates improved one or more nutrition practices
  • 84% of adult graduates improved one or more food resource management practices
  • 57% of youth graduates improved one or more food safety practices
  • 79% of youth improved one or more nutrition practices
  • 37% of youth improved physical activity behaviors

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Family Nutrition Program (FNP) (SNAP-ED)

FNP is a nutrition education program for individuals and families who are receiving or are eligible to receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits. 

The FNP helps individuals and families select nutritious foods that fit within a limited budget. 

Nutrition educators meet participants in many settings including county Social Services offices, WIC clinics, Head Start, food pantries, schools, senior meal sites and public health clinics.

FNP 2019 Program Impacts

 During program year 2019, FNP provided direct education to 975 eligible adults and 4,545 youth across North Dakota. Additionally, over 36,095 citizens were impacted by multi-level outreach, including policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) change approaches.

FNP participants reported improved health and food resource management behaviors following FNP lessons including:

  • 73% of youth choose healthier snacks
  • 80% of youth are more physically active
  • 71% of youth drink less sugar-sweetened beverages and 61% drink more water
  • 53% of adults are eating more vegetables and 50% are eating more fruit
  • 70% of adults adopted one or more habits to spend their food dollars more wisely 

 

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