Food and Nutrition

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Food Preservation

Why Add Lemon Juice to Tomatoes and Salsa Before Canning? (FN1396)

You may have heard that adding lemon juice, citric acid or another acid to tomatoes before canning is important, but maybe you are not sure why. It’s all about pH.

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Wild Side of the Menu No. 3 - Preservation of Game Meats and Fish - FN155

Wild game provides wholesome, nourishing food, but it should be handled and preserved carefully to retain quality. Like domestic meat, wild meat is perishable, so care is needed to maintain its safety. The purpose of this publication is to provide recommendations for safely preserving game meats and fish for later enjoyment. Freezing meat and fish is the most accepted way to maintain top quality. Other methods for preserving game meats include curing and smoking, drying, corning, canning and sausage making. Fish also may be pickled or canned.

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FOOD PRESERVATION: Let’s Preserve Fruit Pie Fillings FN-434 (Revised)

The fruit fillings in this publication are excellent and safe products. Each canned quart makes one 8-inch to 9-inch pie. Fillings may be used as toppings on dessert or pastries. Clear Jel is a starch modified to produce excellent sauce consistency even after fillings are canned and baked. Other available household starches break down, causing a runny sauce consistency when used in pie fillings.

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Food Freezing Basics: Freezing Poultry and Fish - FN615

This publication guides you through proper techniques for freezing, thawing and preparing poultry and fish.

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Food Freezing Basics: Packaging, Loading the Freezer and Refreezing - FN614

Freezing is one of the easiest, quickest, most versatile and most convenient methods of preserving foods. Properly frozen foods maintain more of their original color, flavor and texture and generally more of their nutrients than foods preserved by other methods.

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Food Freezing Basics: Freezing Dairy Products, Eggs and Other Foods - FN616

This publication provides basic instructions for freezing dairy products, eggs along with, extra hints for additional foods.

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The Art and Practice of Sausage Making - FN176

Sausage is a convenient food available in a great number of varieties and flavors. Sausages are an excellent source of high quality protein, containing all the essential amino acids in appropriate amounts necessary for growth, maintenance and repair of body tissue. Sausage also provides significant amounts of vitamins and minerals.

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Make Your Own Home-canned Condiments (FN1861)

This handout provides a collection of research-tested condiment recipes, including barbecue sauce, ketchup, taco sauce, pickle relish and pepper rings.

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Drying Vegetables

Drying Vegetables FN580

Drying is a long-standing, fairly easy method of food preservation. Whenever you preserve foods, choose the best-quality fruits and vegetables. As with other food preservation methods, drying does not improve food quality. Proper and successful drying produces safe food with good flavor, texture, color and nutritional properties.

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Jerky Making: Producing a Traditional Food With Modern Processes FN580 (Revised)

Jerky is a nutrient-dense, convenient and shelf-stable meat product that has grown in popularity world wide. Derived from the Spanish word “charqui,” which describes dried meat strips, jerky may be produced using a combination of curing, smoking and drying procedures. Traditionally jerky was made by the use of sun, wind, and smoke from fires as a way to Jerky is a nutrient-dense, convenient, shelf-stable meat product that can be made from just about any type of raw meat ingredients. Its name is derived from the Spanish word “charqui,” which describes dried meat strips. Jerky is produced using combinations of curing, smoking and drying procedures.

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Safe Food for Babies and Children: Making Homemade Baby Food for Babies 6 Months and Older (FN1848)

This handout provides general guidance for making pureed foods at home, which can be a money-saving option or a personal preference. Making your own baby food has several advantages. You will expose your baby to more flavors, which could allow for a more adventurous eater. You also can limit sugar and salt to provide good nutrition for your baby.

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From Orchard to Table: Apples! (FN1847)

Research continues to show that the fiber and natural antioxidants and other phytochemicals ("plant chemicals") in apples may help prevent chronic diseases. Learn about growing apple trees, apples and health, and how to preserve and prepare apples.

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Home Canning Meat Poultry, Red Meats, Game and Seafood (FN188 (Revised))

Poultry, red meats, game and seafoods are low-acid foods and must be processed in a pressure canner to assure their safety. This publications provides general tips for high-quality products, general procedures and recipes.

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Home Canning Low-acid Vegetables

Home Canning Low-Acid Vegetables - FN173

The method used for canning a product is determined primarily by the acidity of the food or mixture of foods being canned. Low-acid foods must be processed in a pressure canner to be free of botulism risks.

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Salsa II

Let's Preserve Salsa II - FN1584

Salsa continues to grow in popularity. While most people think of salsa as a spicy tomato-based sauce, it also can be made from various fruits.

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Sauerkraut

Sauerkraut: From Garden to Table - FN433

Making sauerkraut is often part of introductory classes in microbiology. To avoid a "science experiment gone wrong" at home, follow the recommendations in this publication from garden to table.

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Freezing Vegetables

Freezing Vegetables - FN187

Following the guidelines in this publication will help ensure that your frozen vegetables remain nutritious and high in quality.

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Freezing Fruits

Freezing Fruits - FN182

Freezing is one of the easiest methods of preserving foods. Following the guidelines in this circular will help ensure that your frozen fruits remain nutritious and high in quality.

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Winter Squash!

Field to Fork Winter Squash! - FN1801

Squash has been used as a nutritious food for thousands of years in North America. You might find buttercup, butternut, acorn and/or spaghetti squash in your local grocery store. Botanists consider squash to be a fruit, but it is used as a vegetable on menus.

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Tomatoes!

Field to Fork Tomatoes! - FN1800

Botanically, a tomato is classified as a fruit because it has seeds and is derived from flower tissue. Nutritionists consider tomatoes to be “vegetables” on the menu. Tomatoes can be frozen, canned or dried, so we can enjoy them year-round.

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