Food and Nutrition

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Food Preservation

Safe Food for Babies and Children: Making Homemade Baby Food for Babies 6 Months and Older (FN1848)

This handout provides general guidance for making pureed foods at home, which can be a money-saving option or a personal preference. Making your own baby food has several advantages. You will expose your baby to more flavors, which could allow for a more adventurous eater. You also can limit sugar and salt to provide good nutrition for your baby.

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From Orchard to Table: Apples! (FN1847)

Research continues to show that the fiber and natural antioxidants and other phytochemicals ("plant chemicals") in apples may help prevent chronic diseases. Learn about growing apple trees, apples and health, and how to preserve and prepare apples.

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Home Canning Meat Poultry, Red Meats, Game and Seafood (FN188 (Revised))

Poultry, red meats, game and seafoods are low-acid foods and must be processed in a pressure canner to assure their safety. This publications provides general tips for high-quality products, general procedures and recipes.

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Jerky Making

Jerky Making: then and now - FN580

Jerky is a nutrient-dense, convenient and shelf-stable meat product that has grown in popularity world wide. Derived from the Spanish word “charqui,” which describes dried meat strips, jerky may be produced using a combination of curing, smoking and drying procedures. Traditionally jerky was made by the use of sun, wind, and smoke from fires as a way to preserve and extend the shelf-life of meat. American Indians mixed berries or suet with the pounded dried meat to make pemmican. Today it is produced from either thin strips of meat (beef, pork, lamb, venison, poultry) or ground and formed meat. Many varieties of commercial seasonings are available for home use as a one-step procedure.

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Home Canning Low-acid Vegetables

Home Canning Low-Acid Vegetables - FN173

The method used for canning a product is determined primarily by the acidity of the food or mixture of foods being canned. Low-acid foods must be processed in a pressure canner to be free of botulism risks.

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Salsa II

Let's Preserve Salsa II - FN1584

Salsa continues to grow in popularity. While most people think of salsa as a spicy tomato-based sauce, it also can be made from various fruits.

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Sauerkraut

Sauerkraut: From Garden to Table - FN433

Making sauerkraut is often part of introductory classes in microbiology. To avoid a "science experiment gone wrong" at home, follow the recommendations in this publication from garden to table.

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Freezing Vegetables

Freezing Vegetables - FN187

Following the guidelines in this publication will help ensure that your frozen vegetables remain nutritious and high in quality.

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Freezing Fruits

Freezing Fruits - FN182

Freezing is one of the easiest methods of preserving foods. Following the guidelines in this circular will help ensure that your frozen fruits remain nutritious and high in quality.

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Winter Squash!

Field to Fork Winter Squash! - FN1801

Squash has been used as a nutritious food for thousands of years in North America. You might find buttercup, butternut, acorn and/or spaghetti squash in your local grocery store. Botanists consider squash to be a fruit, but it is used as a vegetable on menus.

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Tomatoes!

Field to Fork Tomatoes! - FN1800

Botanically, a tomato is classified as a fruit because it has seeds and is derived from flower tissue. Nutritionists consider tomatoes to be “vegetables” on the menu. Tomatoes can be frozen, canned or dried, so we can enjoy them year-round.

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Sweet Corn!

Field to Fork Sweet Corn! - FN1799

Sweet corn on the cob (or off the cob) is a tasty addition to meals. Corn, also called “maize,” is sold by color, not variety (white, yellow or bicolor). Corn can be preserved in different ways to be enjoyed year-round.

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Snap Beans!

Field to Fork Snap Beans! - FN1798

Snap beans are delicious vegetables that are easy for people of all ages to grow. They are easy to preserve, so we can enjoy them year-round.

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Raspberries!

Field to Fork Raspberries! - FN1797

Raspberries are part of the rose family, and numerous varieties are available. The low-calorie fruits add flavor, color and nutrition to your menu.

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Pumpkins!

Field to Fork Pumpkins! - FN1796

Pumpkins are one of the colorful symbols of autumn. Most people think of using them solely for the purpose of carving and displaying, but pumpkin can be used in many ways on your menu, including soups and desserts. Try roasting the seeds for a crunchy snack.

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Potaotes!

Field to Fork Potatoes! - FN1795

More than 5,000 varieties of potatoes are grown throughout the world. The average person in the U.S. eats 124 pounds of potatoes every year. Potatoes can be used in a wide variety of recipes.

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Onions!

Field to Fork Onions! - FN1794

Many types of onions are available to grow and use. Onions are ranked sixth among the world’s leading vegetable crops. On average, people eat about 20 pounds of onions a year.

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Leafy Greens!

Field to Fork Leafy Greens! - FN1793

Leafy greens include lettuce, spinach, Swiss chard, kale and arugula. They are easy to grow and prepare, and provide a wide variety of nutrients.

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Field to Fork Apples!

Field to Fork Apples! - FN1792

Apples are members of the rose family, and more than 7,500 varieties are grown throughout the world. Apples can be eaten fresh, frozen, canned or dried.

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Let's Preserve Peaches!

Let's Preserve Peaches! - FN1762

Peaches are a delicious fruit that are “in season,” at their best quality and, often, best price in late summer. This publication provides step-by-step instructions for preserving them.

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