Food and Nutrition

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Food Safety

Warming Bottles Safely

Safe Food for Babies and Children: Warming Bottles Safely - FN716

For the first year of a baby's life, breast milk or infant formula should be used to provide the nutrition necessary to promote growth and general health. Pre-mixed infant formula and expressed breast milk do not need to be heated prior to feeding. However, many babies prefer warm bottles because of the similarity to warm milk fed from the breast.

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Storing Caned and Packaged Food

Questions and Answers About Storing Food in the Freezer - FN1465

A food safety study was conducted with 58 international students from 30 different countries at North Dakota State University. Participants indicated the kind of food safety information they would like to get to help them safely handle new and unfamiliar foods they encountered in the U.S. many of the participants asked for information about food storage, preserving leftovers, proper handling of salads and fresh vegetables, and the safety of processed and frozen foods.

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Storing Food in the Refrigerator

Questions and Answers About Storing Food in the Refrigerator - FN1466 -

A food safety study was conducted with 58 international students from 30 different countries at North Dakota State University. Participants indicated the kind of food safety information they would like to get to help them safely handle new and unfamiliar foods they encountered in the U.S. Many of the participants asked for information about food storage, preserving leftovers, proper handling of salads and fresh vegetables, and the safety of processed and frozen foods.

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Storing Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

Questions and Answers About Storing Fresh Fruits and Vegetables - FN1467

A food safety study was conducted with 58 international students from 30 different countries at North Dakota State University. Participants indicated the kind of food safety information they would like to get to help them safely handle new and unfamiliar foods they encountered in the U.S. Many of the participants asked for information about food storage, preserving leftovers, proper handling of salads and fresh vegetables, and the safety of processed and frozen foods.

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Storing Canned and Packaged Food

Questions and Answers About Storing Canned and Packaged Food - FN1468

A food safety study was conducted with 58 international students from 30 different countries at North Dakota State University. Participants indicated the kind of food safety information they would like to get to help them safely handle new and unfamiliar foods they encountered in the U.S. Many of the participants asked for information about food storage, preserving leftovers, proper handling of salads and fresh vegetables, and the safety of processed and frozen foods.

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Seniors and Food Safety: Why are Seniors at Risk for Foodborne Illness?

Seniors and Food Safety: Why are Seniors at Risk for Foodborne Illness? - FN698

James L. Smith, a microbiologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, wanted to find the answer to the question of why seniors are more at risk for foodborne illness. He reviewed data from foodborne outbreaks at nursing homes, and compared the immune and digestive systems of seniors and younger individuals, as well as evaluating the overall physical well-being of seniors.

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Seniors and Food Safety: What's a Senior to Eat?

Seniors and Food Safety: What's a Senior to Eat? - FN699

Smart food choices can help reduce the risk for chronic diseases, such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, stroke and osteoporosis. These are the leading cause of death and disability among Americans.

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To Market, To Market

Seniors and Food Safety: To Market, To Market - FN700

This publication provides you with tips to prevent foodborne illness, beginning with the trip to the supermarket and ending with the proper temperatures the food should be cooked.

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Seniors and Food Safety: What's Cooking?

Seniors and Food Safety: What's Cooking? - FN701

Prevent foodborne illness with these four simple steps to prepare food safely at home.

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Seniors and Food Safety: When Someone Else is the Cook

Seniors and Food Safety: When Someone Else is the Cook - FN702

Let’s face it. Sometimes letting someone else do the cooking is just easier and more enjoyable. And today’s seniors have many eating options. However, all of these options do have food safety implications.

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Seniors and Food Safety: When Grandparents Take Care of Grandchildren

Seniors and Food Safety: When Grandparents Take Care of Grandchildren - FN703

Many of the feeding practices you used with your own children may no longer be advocated for today’s infants and toddlers. Let’s take a look at the food safety implications of feeding a special new person in your life.

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Home Canning Meat Poultry, Red Meats, Game and Seafood - FN188

Poultry, red meats, game and seafoods are low-acid foods and must be processed in a pressure canner to assure their safety. This publications provides general tips for high-quality products, general procedures and recipes.

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Making Pickled Products - FN189

Pickling is one of the oldest known methods of food preservation. Pickled foods add a special touch to many snacks and meals.

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Boiling Water-bath Canner

Questions and Answers About Using a Boiling Water-bath Canner - FN1425

Water-bath canning is a method of preserving high-acid foods. Fresh foods contain a high percentage of water, which makes them very perishable. High-acid foods can be preserved safely when they reach temperatures provided by a boiling water-bath canner. To kill harmful molds, yeasts and some bacteria, processing using the boiling water-bath method ensures the safety of preserved produce. However, this method does not provide high enough temperatures to destroy botulinum spores in low-acid foods such as vegetables.

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Family & Food safety

Common Kitchen Practices Aren't Always Safe

By Julie Garden-Robinson, Food and Nutrition Specialist NDSU Extension Service

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My Potatoes Turned Green

From Garden to Table: My Potatoes Turned Green Now What? - A1768

Potato tubers turn green when they are exposed to sunlight during growth or storage. The green comes from the pigment chlorophyll. Potato tubers exposed to light will become green naturally as the plant seeks to harvest the light.

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All About Food Allergens: Eggs (FN1827)

This publication deals with food allergies and is intended for the use in parent education programs and by high school teachers.

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All About Food Allergens: Peanuts (FN1828)

This publication about food allergies is intended to be used in parent education programs and by high school teachers.

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All About Food Allergens: Wheat (FN1829)

This publication deals with food allergies and is intended for the use in parent education programs and by high school teachers.

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