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Stay Hydrated This Month and All Year

As the temperature continues to rise, try a big glass of ice water or a cold slice of fresh, juicy watermelon. Staying hydrated throughout the "dog days" is crucial to keeping cool and safe throughout summer.

The "dog days" of summer have begun.

The phrase originates with Roman and Greek astrology patterns indicating several weeks in August that bring excessive heat, grogginess, drought, random thunderstorms and overall disarray.

As the temperature continues to rise, try a big glass of ice water or a cold slice of fresh, juicy watermelon. Staying hydrated throughout the "dog days" is crucial to keeping cool and safe throughout summer.

Hydration is responsible for regulating temperature, preventing constipation, padding joints and transporting nutrients and oxygen throughout the body. Feeling thirsty is one of the first indicators of already being dehydrated, along with symptoms such as lethargy, fatigue, nausea, headache, dizziness and/or dark-colored urine.

Drinking water is a great way to hydrate; however, a lot of water is hidden in foods eaten every day. Fruits and vegetables are very high in water content and a good hydration source.

Fruits and vegetables are a tasty and colorful way to incorporate more fluid into the diet.

  • Fruits such as watermelon, strawberries, grapefruit, cantaloupe, pineapple, cranberries, oranges, raspberries and grapes are anywhere from 85% to 92% water.
  • Vegetables such as celery, cucumbers, tomatoes, zucchini, spinach, broccoli and bell peppers are all more than 90% water.

Adding some of these foods in a salad, smoothie or even as a snack with a dip will contribute to increased water intake throughout the day. Try adding fresh or frozen strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, lemons, oranges, cucumbers or mint leaves to a bottle of water for a low-calorie way to enhance the flavor of the water.

 

Maggie Cowan, Dietetic Intern,
NDSU Extension

Filed under: fca newsletter

Sponsored in part by the Sanford Health Foundation.

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