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Optimum and Last Planting Date

Seeding Date

Northern NDSept. 1 - 15
Southern ND Sept. 10-30

Standing stubble increases likelihood of winter survival.  The most effective residue crop is flax. Flax can be established as a lightly seeded solid stand, in wide rows (i.e. 3-4 feet spacing) or as strips. Strips of flax 3 to 5 feet wide and 15 feet apart have been found to effectively trap snow while minimally depleting soil moisture. When seeding flax in strips or in wide row spacings, the drill should be set at a high seeding rate (40 pounds per acre) and drill spouts should be taped shut to obtain the desired spacing. Strips of flax more than 20 feet apart can be risky as they do not catch sufficient snow in most years. Flax should be seeded in mid- to late July or early August, depending on the region of the state. Flax should not be seeded after August 15.

From: The Small Grains Field Guide A-290, J.J. Wiersma and J.K. Ransom, 2005. “Establishing Winter Wheat in Land Not Planted this Spring”, Crop and Pest Report, J.K. Ransom, 7/14/2011.

Late Seeding

Planting after recommended dates will reduce winter hardiness and winter survival.  Seed more winter hardy varieties as the fall-grown small seedlings will have greater risk of winter kill.  Increase seeding rate by 150,000 to 200,000 seeds per acre.  Normal seeding rate is 900,000 seeds per acre (70 lbs. per acre). If available, plant into standing stubble to help catch snow and insulate crowns from winter temperatures. Use starter phosphorous, especially if soil levels are low.  Consider using fungicide seed treatment if seed is expected to lay in the ground for an extended time. If wireworms are present, use an insecticide seed treatment.

From: The Small Grains Field Guide A-290, J.J. Wiersma and J.K. Ransom, 2005. “Tips for Planting Winter Wheat Late”, Crop and Pest Report, J.K. Ransom, 8/2/2013.

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