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Plant Sugarbeet into Fields with Known Herbicide History (06/25/15)

Last week I walked a sugarbeet field with nearly 100% stand loss on the low organic matter, eroded, higher elevation areas of the field.

Plant Sugarbeet into Fields with Known Herbicide History

Last week I walked a sugarbeet field with nearly 100% stand loss on the low organic matter, eroded, higher elevation areas of the field. Field history was incomplete as the field had been farmed by the current grower for only two years. Upon closer evaluation and consultation with Dr. Dexter, retired Extension Sugarbeet Specialist, we believe the symptoms on dying sugarbeet were from an imadazolinone herbicide, such as Pursuit or Raptor. I have walked other fields where damaged sugarbeet appear to be result of herbicide carryover.

Recall that following the wet spring, 2014 was relatively dry in many areas. We did not have much snow cover and spring 2015 started very dry. I believe my observations are a product of cold and dry conditions and are accentuated in areas where there are overlaps including head lands of fields.

Sugarbeet is more sensitive than most crops to carryover of herbicides. Record of herbicide use in the previous year is essential but herbicides carry over for several years. Long term herbicide history is needed if very persistent herbicides may have been used in the field. For example, Pursuit herbicide damaged sugarbeet six years after application in soybean on a pH 5.2 soil.

Premixes might be another culprit. There are several (many) packaged premixes that contain imazethapyr, the active ingredient in Pursuit. Read the label and, if needed, get advice on the various components of mixtures and the risk of injury from your sugarbeet agriculturalist, extension agent/specialist or company representative.

wdsci.peters.2.herbicide carryover mn

Tom Peters

Extension Sugarbeet Agronomist, NDSU & U of MN

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