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Palmer Amaranth Confirmed in North Dakota (08/30/18)

Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) a member of the pigweed family was found in North Dakota for the first time. Laboratory analysis confirmed that a plant found in a row crop field in McIntosh County in southcentral North Dakota is Palmer amaranth.

Palmer Amaranth Confirmed in North Dakota

Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) a member of the pigweed family was found in North Dakota for the first time. Laboratory analysis confirmed that a plant found in a row crop field in McIntosh County in southcentral North Dakota is Palmer amaranth. A diligent farmer was scouting his field and hand-weeding waterhemp when he came across plants that looked unusual and wondered if they could be Palmer amaranth. The farmer pulled the plants to keep them from going to seed. He showed the plants to a local agronomist that contacted NDSU for confirmation.

Palmer amaranth is pigweed that originated in the desert region of the southwestern U.S. and has spread to the Mississippi Delta before invading Missouri, Kansas, Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota and South Dakota, as well as other states. The plant in McIntosh County likely came from seeds dropped by migratory birds.

Identifying Palmer amaranth can be difficult because it resembles redroot pigweed, Powell amaranth and waterhemp. One of the best ways to distinguish Palmer amaranth from the other pigweed family plants is its leaf stem, or petiole. Palmer amaranth’s petiole is as long as or longer than the leaf blade. Another characteristic is Palmer amaranth’s distinctive, long, snaky seed heads. The seed heads can grow up to 2 feet long. Visit NDSU Extension’s Palmer amaranth website at https://www.ag.ndsu.edu/palmeramaranth to learn more about Palmer amaranth and how to identify it.

Anyone who sees a plant that looks different and suspects it may be Palmer amaranth should contact their ag-retailer, crop consultant, industry or their local NDSU Extension agent as soon as possible.

peters 

 

Tom Peters

 Extension Sugarbeet Agronomist

NDSU & U of MN

 

Brian Jenks

Research Weed Science, NC R&E Center, Minot

 

Ellen Crawford

Information Specialist, Extension Ag Communication

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