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Herbicide: Fungicide Combinations in Sugarbeet (5/18/17)

Rhizoctonia can cause damping-off of sugarbeet seedlings and root rot when soils are warm and moist. Control strategies include resistant sugarbeet varieties, seed treatments, and in-furrow fungicides.

Herbicide: Fungicide Combinations in Sugarbeet

Rhizoctonia can cause damping-off of sugarbeet seedlings and root rot when soils are warm and moist. Control strategies include resistant sugarbeet varieties, seed treatments, and in-furrow fungicides. Application of azoxystrobin (Qaudris and generics such as Aframe and Satori), Priaxor or Proline in a 7-inch band before infection occurs or when the average soil temperature at 4-inch depth ranges from 60 to 62F is commonly used for managing rhizoctonia.

Growers often wish to combine fungicide application for rhizoctonia control with herbicides for early season weed control. Fungicides plus sugarbeet herbicides may cause more leaf burn than when fungicides are applied alone, especially as air temperature and humidity increase at application. Fungicide plus glyphosate or Stinger (solutions) are safe to sugarbeet when applied without nonionic surfactant or other oil adjuvants. However, fungicides, particularly azoxystrobins plus Betamix, Dual Magnum or Outlook (oil-based) typically cause more sugarbeet injury than when fungicides are applied alone.

A jar test is recommended prior to tank mixing to ensure compatibility with fungicides. Use a clear glass quart jar with lid and mix the tank mix ingredients in the required order and their relative proportions. Add water dispersible granular products first, and solutions last. Invert the jar containing the mixture several times and observe the mixture for approximately 30 minutes. Mixture is not compatible and the tank-mix combination should not be used if the mixture forms flakes, sludges, jells, oily films or layers, or other precipitates.

Tom Peters

Extension Sugarbeet Agronomist

NDSU & U of MN

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