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AMS in Holding Tanks (06/23/16)

Question: A question about dry AMS. I have a large grower that is going back to dry AMS vs a commercial liquid product. Is there any problem if he pre-mixes his AMS in his holding tanks at the correct rates needed for the farm? There could be times when the 4000 gal tanks sit full for 5 days or more if a large rain event occurs, etc. All my other guys mix the dry as they spray by the tank load, but he needs to pre-mix it in his holding tanks if possible due to the size of his operation and to speed up the spraying process. He will be inducting the AMS thru a cone into the large holding tanks, so he should get a good mix.

AMS in Holding Tanks

Question: A question about dry AMS. I have a large grower that is going back to dry AMS vs a commercial liquid product. Is there any problem if he pre-mixes his AMS in his holding tanks at the correct rates needed for the farm? There could be times when the 4000 gal tanks sit full for 5 days or more if a large rain event occurs, etc. All my other guys mix the dry as they spray by the tank load, but he needs to pre-mix it in his holding tanks if possible due to the size of his operation and to speed up the spraying process. He will be inducting the AMS thru a cone into the large holding tanks, so he should get a good mix.

Answer: Good question – realistically there is nothing different from what you are asking compared to a standard liquid AMS solution. AMS is a salt and remains in solutions. It does not hydrolyze or oxidize. The solution will not precipitate until maximum concentration is exceeded – which is approximately 3.4 lbs/gallon of water – See page 74 in 2016 ND Weed Control Guide.

Premixing AMS is a very good idea to save time. The only concern I have would when water temperature is cold and the salts may precipitation. Warm water can solubilize salts at a higher concentration than cold water…..duh, that was a worthless statement- everybody knows that.

Rich Zollinger

Extension Weed Specialist

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