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A Unique way for Palmer Amaranth to Invade (08/17/17)

Many of you know palmer amaranth arrived as a seed contaminant in pollinator mixes in Minnesota in 2016. There might be a new twist on introduction.

A Unique way for Palmer Amaranth to Invade

Many of you know palmer amaranth arrived as a seed contaminant in pollinator mixes in Minnesota in 2016. There might be a new twist on introduction.

A homeowner reported buying flower seeds from China and potting soil from Walmart. A plant with an unusual flower structure grew from the planted pot. A sample sent to Minnesota Department of Ag was not fit for identification. However, the homeowner had pictures; the pictures showed plants that resembled Palmer amaranth.

Moral of the story, Palmer amaranth may arrive through ornamental seed lots and/or potting soils. This currently is not a confirmed port-of-entry but it is possible, and is something to be vigilant of, especially in areas where spent potting soil might be spread on fields or gardens that can easily transfer weeds and weed seeds to crop fields.

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Tom Peters

Extension Sugarbeet Agronomist

NDSU & U of MN

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