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South-Central/Southeast ND (05/13/21)

Information from the South Central/Southeast region of North Dakota.

Crop planting continues at a rapid pace but plant establishment continues to be slow due to cool air and soil temperatures, and generally dry soils. According to NDAWN, rainfall April 1 through May 10 ranged from 0.3 inch (Dazey, McHenry and Robinson) to 1.9 inches (Lisbon), with 0.8 inch at the Carrington Research Extension Center (CREC).

Crop planting continues at a rapid pace but plant establishment continues to be slow due to cool air and soil temperatures, and generally dry soils. According to NDAWN, rainfall April 1 through May 10 ranged from 0.3 inch (Dazey, McHenry and Robinson) to 1.9 inches (Lisbon), with 0.8 inch at the Carrington Research Extension Center (CREC).

Alfalfa regrowth at the CREC is at <5-inch height. Winter rye and winter wheat are in the tillering to jointing growth stages, with most advanced growth and adequate plant densities present where seed was planted into adequate soil moisture last fall. April-planted small grain growth stages range from emerging plants to two-leaf stage. Estimates on planting progress as percent of acres for corn ranges from 70-90% and soybean at 40-60%. April-planted corn should be emerging late this week. Pasture growth is slow. Weeds are becoming more abundant (especially wild buckwheat and common lambsquarters at CREC), including newly emerged foxtail.

While minimum soil temperatures for dry bean germination are the mid 50s, NDSU recommends planting when soil temperatures are consistently in the mid 60s. Typical North Dakota dry bean planting dates range from the last 10 days in May to the first 10 days in June. Six site-years of planting date research conducted by NDSU with pinto, black and navy beans indicated no yield advantage with early planting (before May 20). Research details can be found in the NDSU Extension circular ‘Impact of Planting Dates on Dry Edible Bean’.

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Greg Endres

Extension Cropping Systems Specialist

This site is supported in part by the Crop Protection and Pest Management Program [grant no. 2017-70006-27144/accession 1013592] from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed are those of the website author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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