Crop & Pest Report

Accessibility


| Share

Plant Analysis (07/02/20)

Plant analysis can be a useful tool to determine in-season deficiencies of nutrients.

Plant analysis can be a useful tool to determine in-season deficiencies of nutrients. It is best to take a sample from a ‘good’ area of the field and from one ‘not-as-good’. The lab conducting the plant analysis will have tables on file of ‘sufficiency’ and ‘deficiency’ ranges, but these are meant as general guides. There is great variability in nutrient critical levels for varieties within a crop. Therefore, taking the paired samples in a field from good and not-so-good will help determine whether a nutrient is out of line for that variety.

For most nutrient analysis washing plants is not necessary, except when a heavy rain has splashed excessive mud onto leaves. However, for iron (Fe) analysis, it is absolutely necessary to wash the leaves/plant with distilled water, pat dry with clean paper towels, before drying and or shipping to the laboratory. It is best to take the samples directly to the lab for analysis, or dry well. If fresh sample sits in an envelope, say over the 4th of July weekend, the sample may turn to silage and be unusable.

 

Dave Franzen

Extension Soil Specialist

701-799-2565

 

This site is supported in part by the Crop Protection and Pest Management Program [grant no. 2017-70006-27144/accession 1013592] from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed are those of the website author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

USDA logo

Creative Commons License
Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. Thanks.