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Another Planning Strategy for 2021 Soybean IDC Management (07/30/20)

As presented in last week’s NDSU Crop & Pest Report, a companion crop of oat, barley helps reduce IDC severity in soybean when seeded about the same time.

As presented in last week’s NDSU Crop & Pest Report, a companion crop of oat, barley helps reduce IDC severity in soybean when seeded about the same time. It may also be possible to use cereal rye or winter wheat (or a mixture) planted this summer, and allowed the cereal to grow in early spring as a companion crop option to reduce soil moisture and soil nitrate. The rye or winter wheat could be planted anytime between now and the middle of October, with the seeding rate increasing as it moves further into fall. The rye or winter wheat should be terminated early if spring conditions turn dry, or allowed to grow a little more if conditions are wet. Winter rye or winter wheat would not head out if seeded soon or into September and it could be seeded with another annual cover crop if seeding was late enough so that it would not head out prior to freeze-up.

The optimum period for seeding winter cereals for winter survival and early spring regrowth is the first two weeks of September. Earlier planted winter cereals may be grazed when conditions for establishment and growth are favorable. Late seed winter cereals will vernalize even if they do not visibly establish as long as the seeds imbibe water and have sprouted before soil temperatures are too cold for growth. Nevertheless, spring development when planted late (or when conditions are not favorable for germination and establishment) will be slower from these sprouts/seedlings than from seedlings that have several leaves prior to freeze up.

When choosing to use winter wheat if spring wheat is planned for a field nearby the following spring, delay winter wheat planting until mid-September and only after breaking the green bridge, as winter wheat can serve a source of wheat streak mosaic virus. Rye is a poor host of the wheat curl mite (the vector of the wheat streak mosaic virus) and may be a better choice in these situations.

 

Dave Franzen

Extension Soil Specialist

701-799-2565

 

With input from

Dr. Joel Ransom

Dr. Hans Kandel

Dr. Abbey Wick

This site is supported in part by the Crop Protection and Pest Management Program [grant no. 2017-70006-27144/accession 1013592] from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed are those of the website author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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