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Potato Periderm Disorder Syndrome, Previous Called Pink Eye (09/12/19)

Excessive moisture and warm temperatures in many potato growing regions has led to a physiological disorder now called ‘Periderm Disorder Syndrome’.

Excessive moisture and warm temperatures in many potato growing regions has led to a physiological disorder now called ‘Periderm Disorder Syndrome’. This syndrome was previously referred to as ‘pink eye’ as it can be expressed as a pinkish color and raised areas on the tuber surface. In some cases, Periderm Disorder Syndrome can develop into corky areas on the tuber skin, often described as elephant hide or corky patch. In these cases, a pink color is not expressed; hence, the name change to Periderm Disorder Syndrome. This is a physiological disorder caused by the death of meristematic periderm cells leading to the loss of periderm integrity, causing abnormal internal suberization. Because the periderm does not fully heal, it can be a gateway for secondary pathogens. If this disorder is present in fields at this time of year, some steps can be taken to mitigate the effects this could have on the crop. To reduced problems caused by Periderm Disorder Syndrome use careful handling practices to reduce injury to tubers during harvest, do not store tubers or minimize storage length, and if storing, use cool and dry conditions to prevent the spread of pathogens.

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Andy Robinson

NDSU/U of M Extension Potato Agronomist

 

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