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New Chickpea Publication (09/13/18)

NDSU authors have recently updated the Growing Chickpea in North Dakota (A1236) publication.

New Chickpea Publication

NDSU authors have recently updated the Growing Chickpea in North Dakota (A1236) publication. The publication is intended for growers considering kabuli or desi chickpea as a crop. The text covers basic plant growth habit, crop production, field selection, seedbed preparation, fertilization, inoculation, seeding, weed control, diseases, insects, rotational benefits and harvesting.

Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) originated in what is now southeastern Turkey and Syria and was domesticated about 9,000 B.C. It is an annual grain legume or “pulse” crop sold in human-food markets.

Chickpea is classified as kabuli or desi type, based primarily on seed color. Kabuli chickpea, sometimes called garbanzo bean, has a white to cream-colored seed coat and ranges in size from small to large (greater than 100 to less than 50 seeds per ounce). Desi chickpea has a pigmented (tan to black) seed coat and small seeds.

Before selecting a variety, contact potential buyers to ensure it is accepted in the market you are targeting. Variety information is available on the NDSU variety trial website at https://www.ag.ndsu.edu/varietytrials/chickpea

Chickpea is a high-value crop that is adapted to deep soils in the semiarid northern Great Plains. However, disease risks are high, and Ascochyta blight can cause devastating financial losses for growers. Thus, this crop is recommended only for producers who are willing to scout diligently and actively manage disease pressure throughout the entire growing season.

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Hans Kandel

Extension Agronomist Broadleaf Crops

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