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Low Plant Density and Replanting (06/01/17)

In parts of North Dakota, dry seed beds and low temperatures have delayed the emergence of broadleaf crops.

Low Plant Density and Replanting

In parts of North Dakota, dry seed beds and low temperatures have delayed the emergence of broadleaf crops. Every year a number of fields have lower plant densities than anticipated relative to their seeding rate. Grown under low plant densities, most crops have the ability to branch more, have more pods per plant, have more seeds, or bigger seeds. Before replanting, producers must consider if the additional crop yield will provide sufficient economic returns to justify replanting. Accurately assessing the current plant density is one of the first steps in deciding to replant or leave the crop as is. Table 1 lists the minimum, evenly distributed plant density, which will still have the potential to produce a reasonable crop yield.

Producers should consider that replanting will add additional cost, will require extra labor, and the yield potential of later seeded crops is typically lower than planting at the appropriate time. Finding seed of a high yielding variety to grow during the remaining season may be an additional challenge. For more detailed information about replanting, see the publication A934 Replanting or Late Planting Crops.

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Hans Kandel

Extension Agronomist Broadleaf Crops

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