Crop & Pest Report

Accessibility


| Share

How Fast will Corn Dry Down In the Field this Season? (09/15/16)

Much of the early planted corn in the state has now reached or will soon (within a few days) reach maturity (black layer).

How Fast will Corn Dry Down In the Field this Season?

Much of the early planted corn in the state has now reached or will soon (within a few days) reach maturity (black layer). Corn development has been substantially ahead of average this year, at least for many regions of the state. Growing degree accumulations have been similar to or greater than last year, which turned out to be an exceptional year for early maturity and field dry down. After reaching black layer, corn kernels do not add any additional dry weight and therefore lose moisture by losing water weight through evaporation. Reaching maturity by mid-September is good news with regards to field drying as the rate of moisture loss via evaporation largely depends on air temperature. Relatively humidity obviously plays a role in evaporation, but air temperature is usually the most dominant factor in ND. Warm air has the ability to hold more water vapor than cold air, so warmer air is able to draw more moisture out of the drying kernel than cooler air. Since temperature declines rapidly in North Dakota in the fall, we tend to have fewer good field-drying days in the fall than our neighbors to the south. A good rule of thumb is that most field-drying that is going to occur in the fall will occur prior to November 1st. Furthermore, the chance of having rapid drying is greater early in September than in late October. Therefore, reaching maturity by mid-September positions the crop so that it will dry quickly and hopefully sufficiently so that at harvest little or no artificial drying is needed before putting the grain in the bin.

Not only did we have relatively early maturity of the corn crop last year, we had exceptional weather for drying through the middle of October. Generally speaking, the weather in early October last year was well above average which hastened the drying process. Even with our early maturity this year, how well the crop dries will depend on the weather from now until harvest. Last year we found the drying rate to be around 0.75% per day for the period mid-September to mid-October for several hybrids (see attached graph). This rate of drying was exceptional as in other years we have found the rate to be more in the order of 0.25% to 0.33% loss per day for that period. If we have more normal weather, we can probably expect corn to reach the harvest moistures achieved last year about a week or ten days later than last year. Let’s hope our fall is more like last year than the average so we don’t have to worry about additional drying and pay for those costs!

 plsc.1

Joel Ransom

Extension Agronomist for Cereal Crops

Creative Commons License
Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. Thanks.