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Herbicide Injury in Potatoes (07/26/18)

Throughout this year I have visited some fields with herbicide injury. Herbicide injury in potatoes seems to be increasing in North America.

Herbicide Injury in Potatoes

Throughout this year I have visited some fields with herbicide injury. Herbicide injury in potatoes seems to be increasing in North America. Recent herbicide problems have been a result of carryover in the soil or from off-target movement of herbicide being applied to a nearby area. Herbicide injury in potato not only can reduce yield, but potato quality often is compromised. Contact herbicides can disrupt the growth of potato plants, causing potatoes to become malformed. Systemic herbicides will travel to the growing points - the newest leaf grow and the tubers. When most herbicide residues are found in the tuber they cannot be sold for food or feed. These translocating herbicides stored in seed potato tubers can also cause negative effects when the seed tubers are planted the following growing season. Common herbicides types that translocate causing problems in potato are glyphosate, plant growth regulators and ALS-inhibiting herbicides. If you suspect herbicide injury in your potatoes it is important to follow the instructions of the article Documentation for Suspected Herbicide Drift Damage and follow the instructions found in the previously published article You Have Crop Damage from a Pesticide Misapplication, Now What? (07/19/18).

 

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Andy Robinson

NDSU/U of M Extension Potato Agronomist


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