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2017 Iron-Defeciency Chlorosis Ratings Available (08/17/17)

During the 2017 growing season, Iron-deficiency chlorosis (IDC) has been observed in many soybean fields in North Dakota and northwestern Minnesota.

2017 Iron-Defeciency Chlorosis Ratings Available

During the 2017 growing season, Iron-deficiency chlorosis (IDC) has been observed in many soybean fields in North Dakota and northwestern Minnesota. Symptoms of IDC (see photos) appear if soybean plants are unable to take up enough iron (Fe), even if there is sufficient Fe in the soil. Affected plant tissues are yellow in appearance, with green veins. The symptoms usually show early during the growing season when the plants are in the two to seven trifoliate leaf stages. Soybean plants may grow out of the IDC symptoms and turn green at the end of the vegetative growth stages. Yellowing, browning, and stunting of the plants during the early vegetative stages may result in a reduced soybean yield. Soybean varieties have genetic differences for tolerance to IDC. Variety selection is the best way to combat IDC symptoms in fields with high pH soils, free bicarbonate, and with known chlorosis problems. No soybean variety is immune to chlorosis, but there are large differences between the most tolerant and most susceptible varieties. Selecting a variety with low IDC tolerance for a field with an IDC history, can lead to reduced yield, or even crop failure.

During the 2017 growing season, Iron-deficiency chlorosis (IDC) has been observed in many soybean fields in North Dakota and northwestern Minnesota. Symptoms of IDC (see photos) appear if soybean plants are unable to take up enough iron (Fe), even if there is sufficient Fe in the soil. Affected plant tissues are yellow in appearance, with green veins. The symptoms usually show early during the growing season when the plants are in the two to seven trifoliate leaf stages. Soybean plants may grow out of the IDC symptoms and turn green at the end of the vegetative growth stages. Yellowing, browning, and stunting of the plants during the early vegetative stages may result in a reduced soybean yield. Soybean varieties have genetic differences for tolerance to IDC. Variety selection is the best way to combat IDC symptoms in fields with high pH soils, free bicarbonate, and with known chlorosis problems. No soybean variety is immune to chlorosis, but there are large differences between the most tolerant and most susceptible varieties. Selecting a variety with low IDC tolerance for a field with an IDC history, can lead to reduced yield, or even crop failure.

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Hans Kandel

Extension Agronomist Broadleaf Crops

Ted Helms

NDSU Plant Science, Soybean Breeder


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