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Sugarbeet Crop Progress (06/28/18)

Overall, the sugarbeet crop in most areas in North Dakota and Minnesota is showing good leaf growth and canopy will be closed in most areas within the next 10 days.

Sugarbeet Crop Progress

Overall, the sugarbeet crop in most areas in North Dakota and Minnesota is showing good leaf growth and canopy will be closed in most areas within the next 10 days. There are some areas affected by dry conditions after planting where the plant stand may be lower than our ideal 175 to 200 plants per 100 ft. of 22-inch rows and these fields may have beets at different leaf stages because of different times of emergence. However, these fields with uneven growth and somewhat lower populations will still have good yields with good pest management and will require some more care and patience at harvesting. The Southern Minnesota factory district, which has a good sugarbeet crop, is experiencing much more rain than other production areas.

Fields that have been under water stress are likely to become more susceptible to diseases such as Rhizoctonia and Aphanomyces root rot. Most growers have been using more Rhizoctonia and Aphanomyces tolerant varieties, fungicidal seed treatments as well as incorporating precipitated calcium carbonate, which is the limestone from the sugarbeet production process, into their fields – these practices will help to reduce and manage soil borne diseases including Rhizoctonia and Aphanomyces.

In July, agriculturists will start to sample fields for root weight and sugar concentration which will, at that time, start to give an indication of the potential crop size. I hope that growers using our research-based recommendations will have a phenomenal crop that is produced economically.

The biggest constraint between a high quality and high yielding crop and one that can be of poor sugar quality is the foliar disease, Cercospora leaf spot. We have a high population of overwintering Cercospora spores that have developed resistance to QoI or storbilurin fungicides including Headline, Priaxor and Gem, and have reduced sensitivity to all our other commonly used fungicides.

To effectively control Cercospora leaf spot, growers must mix two different modes of action in each of their applications and start control at first symptoms or at disease onset. Triphenyltin hydroxide (Tin) and triazoles, the mainstay of our program, should always be mixed with other chemistries including Topsin, EBDCs such as mancozeb, copper, or Mankocide, which is a mixture of mancozeb and copper, for effective disease control and managing fungicide resistance.

 

Mohamed Khan

Extension Sugarbeet Specialist

NDSU & U of MN

701-231-8596

 

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