Crop & Pest Report

Accessibility


| Share

Stripe Rust Situation in the USA (05/27/21)

Stripe rust prevalence and distribution in the USA is starting to increase with fairly high levels in Kansas and Nebraska. Last week, stripe rust was confirmed along the Minnesota-South Dakota border (Jared Goplen – UMN Extension Crops Educator).

Stripe rust prevalence and distribution in the USA is starting to increase with fairly high levels in Kansas and Nebraska. Last week, stripe rust was confirmed along the Minnesota-South Dakota border (Jared Goplen – UMN Extension Crops Educator). As a reminder, the stripe rust pathogen overwinters in the southern USA and is dependent on southerly winds to carry spores into the Northern Great Plains. Stripe rust is generally considered a cool-season rust preferring temperatures between 50 to 64°F and only requiring six hours of free leaf moisture (dew or rain) to cause infection on wheat leaves. However, a new population of the pathogen is now better adapted to warmer temperatures.         

It is likely spores have landed in North Dakota, but it is unclear if any infections have occurred. Winter wheat fields or fairly advanced spring wheat fields are at greatest risk for stripe rust detection. When scouting for stripe rust at this point in the growing season, look in the lower canopy and look for “segments” of leaf tissue with yellow to orange pustules (Figure 1). Once/if stripe rust is detected in North Dakota, management information will be presented in upcoming Crop and Pest Reports.

ppth.5

 

Andrew Friskop

Extension Plant Pathology, Cereal Crops

This site is supported in part by the Crop Protection and Pest Management Program [grant no. 2017-70006-27144/accession 1013592] from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed are those of the website author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

USDA logo

Creative Commons License
Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. Thanks.