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Scout for Goss’s Wilt and Leaf Blight in Corn (08/13/15)

Over the past two weeks, areas of the state have encountered rain events with high winds and hail. The wind and hail has caused leaf and stem injury in the crops and increases the risk of bacterial disease development.

Scout for Goss’s Wilt and Leaf Blight in Corn

Over the past two weeks, areas of the state have encountered rain events with high winds and hail. The wind and hail has caused leaf and stem injury in the crops and increases the risk of bacterial disease development. One bacterial disease that is heavily correlated with plant injury is Goss’s leaf blight and wilt (Goss’s) of corn.

Goss’s was first reported in North Dakota in 2011 and since then has been observed in all major corn producing regions in the state. Survey efforts in 2014 documented Goss’s wilt in approximately 39% of scouted fields, stretching from the Red River Valley to the Missouri River bottoms in northwest North Dakota. Generally, incidence of Goss’s was low with only a few symptomatic plants in each field.

Identification

  • Look for long irregular water soaked lesions that run parallel to the midrib of the corn leaf (Figures 1 and 2).
  • “Freckles” will be seen in the center or on the edges of lesions and will be transparent when held up to the sunlight (Figures 3 and 4).
  • Lesions may appear shiny (glazed donut appearance) due to bacterial ooze that has dried (Figure 5)9.ppth.friskop.1.10.ppth.friskop.2 411.ppth.friskop.5
  • Management

    • No in-season management tool is effective for Goss’s, but identification is important for future farm management decisions.
    • Hybrid selection – select a less susceptible hybrid.
    • Crop rotation – the pathogen survives on residue for approximately 10 months, so rotate away from corn.
    • Residue management – Goss’s is a residue-borne disease and methods that reduce the amount of residue on the soil surface should be considered in high risk areas.

     

    Request for Samples

    If you identify Goss’s in your field, please consider help us by sending leaf samples to the NDSU Plant Pathology Department. Samples will be used in Goss’s research conducted by Elizabeth Crane (Ph.D. student). The best way to submit samples is:

     

    1)         Place suspected leaves in-between several sheets of paper to allow the sample to dry and flatten. (i.e.:    magazine, telephone book or in-between sheets of paper with a book placed on top of it)

    2)         Please include information on location (GPS, county, etc.), hybrid, growth stage and previous crop.

    3)         Once leaves are dried, send samples in an envelope using one of the following addresses:

     

     

    USPS

    Andrew Friskop or Elizabeth Crane

    Department of Plant Pathology

    NDSU Dept. #7660

    PO Box 6050

    Fargo, ND 58108-6050

     

    FedEx or UPS

    Andrew Friskop or Elizabeth Crane

    Department of Plant Pathology

    North Dakota State University

    Walster Hall 306

    Fargo, ND 58102


     

    Andrew Friskop

    Extension Plant Pathology, Cereal Crops

 

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