Crop & Pest Report

Accessibility


| Share

Heat Will Express Root Rots (08/13/15)

Less frequent rains and high temperatures are going to stress plants with root problems. Root rot infections often occur early in the growing season, particularly when the soil is wet.

Heat Will Express Root Rots

Less frequent rains and high temperatures are going to stress plants with root problems.  Root rot infections often occur early in the growing season, particularly when the soil is wet.  However, many of those infected plants do not show symptoms until there is less available moisture, forcing the roots to struggle to obtain enough water.  The heat we have had in the last few weeks (and the very hot forecast) will stress plants, and those with root rots infections will show themselves.  We are beginning to see this already, as healthy-looking plants are beginning to wilt and die.  Soybeans are notorious for surviving early root-rot infections, only to begin to wilt later in the season when conditions dry out. 

There is nothing that can be done to manage root rots this late in the season, but it is important to take note of where the damage is so you can manage root rots when you plant back into that field.  Resistant or tolerant varieties, fungicide seed treatments and lengthening crop rotations can all help mitigate future root rot problems.

In addition to root rots, heat will also express other root and stem problems.  I expect to see some plants showing damage from diseases such as soybean cyst nematode and charcoal rot later in the month.  More information will follow in the next issue of the crop and pest report. 

Sam Markell

Extension Plant Pathologist, Broad-leaf Crops

This site is supported in part by the Crop Protection and Pest Management Program [grant no. 2017-70006-27144/accession 1013592] from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed are those of the website author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

USDA logo

Creative Commons License
Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. Thanks.